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Foresight Update 45

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A publication of the Foresight Institute


Foresight Update 45 - Table of Contents | Page1 | Page2 | Page3 | Page4 | Page5

 

South Korea Plans 10-year Nanotech Program

South Korea continues to move forward with its ambitious plans for a national nanotechnology program (see Update 44)

According to an article in the Korea Herald ("MOST draws up 10-year plan for nano technology", by Yang Sung-jin, 25 May 2001), the South Korean Ministry of Science and Technology (MOST) has drawn up a ten-year master plan to nurture nanotechnology in that country.

The plan, part of a bid to position South Korea as one of the top 10 nations in the field by 2010, includes three stages, "with the government pouring 1.37 trillion won in state and private investments into the project in a bid to pave the way for the introduction of NT infrastructure within five years." The ministry said it would hold a forum on the project plan before finalizing the details in July.

And in an interview with United Press International ("South Korean consular describes tech trends", by K. Hearn, 9 June 2001), Sangseon Kim, science consular at the South Korean embassy in Washington, D.C., describes his country's intent to invest 1.5 trillion won ($1.13 billion) in a ten-year nanotechnology investment program.

When asked what he thought of the idea of an international body to steer research and applications of nanotechnology similar to the U.S. National Nanotechnology Initiative, Kim said, "I think that is a good idea. If you image the Human Genome Project, how it involved international cooperation, you see it is a good model. The United States can be a leading country in this field but one country can't cover all areas. International cooperation is important to prove and promote R&D activities."


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Foresight Update 45 - Table of Contents

 

UW, PNNL form partnership for NT research

In an agreement signed 19 April 2001, the University of Washington (UW) in Seattle, and the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) in Richland, Washington announced they have formed the Joint Institute for Nanoscience and Nanotechnology.

The UW, home to the Center for Nanotechnology Research, has established a strong presence in nanotechnology. Last summer, it became the first university in the nation to launch a doctoral degree program in the field (see article in Foresight Update 42). PNNL is located on what used to be known as the Hanford Nuclear Reservation in eastern Washington state. Both UW and PNNL will contribute $500,000 in the first year for administering the joint institute and setting up new programs.

The new institute is described in a UW press release. Additional details are available in an article from the Tri-City Herald.


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Foresight Update 45 - Table of Contents

 

Web Watch.45

by Jim Lewis

Jim Lewishttp://www.ctn.northwestern.edu/
Center for Transportation Nanotechnology at Northwestern University. To advance the education and research frontiers of nanotechn-ology as applied to the transportation sector, this team of scientists, engineers, and transportation experts is investigating the applications of nanoscale science and technologies to produce lighter, stronger materials, better catalysts, and smaller and more sensitive sensors.

http://www.cordis.lu/nanotechnology
CORDIS, the Community Research and Development Information Service, a free service provided by the European Commission, offers access to a wide range of information on EU research and innovation development activities, including nanotechnology. Included are various documents on technical topics, introductions and overviews, community attitudes, funding opportunities, collaboration networks, comparisons of nanotechnology research in the US and Europe, etc.

http://www.pnl.gov/nano/
Nano: Science, Engineering and Technology highlights the work of The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), operated by Battelle for the U.S. Department of Energy, on nanomaterials and nanobiology. Included are accessible overviews of these topics and brief descriptions of individual research projects.

http://www.physics.nist.gov/Divisions/Div841/Gp3/epg_files/front_page.html
The Electron Physics Group at the National Institute of Standards and Technology provides an extensive library of preprints of research papers as well as brief overviews of the facilities and major research projects, including nanoscale physics using scanning tunneling microscopy (STM), observing magnetic nanostructure, using atom optics to make nanostructures, using theory to predict nanometer range phenomena, and using autonomous atom assembly to explore quantum and spin electronics. The well-organized site makes it easy to go from general overviews of research areas, to specific research projects, to downloading publications of research results. There is also a list of openings for postdoctoral scientists and visiting scientists.

http://www.phantomsnet.com/phantom/net/default.html
PHANTOMS: Nanotechnology Network for Information Processing and Storage. Funded by the European Commission (IST programme), PHANTOMS is an interdisciplinary network formed to make sure that Europe does not fall behind the United States and Japan in the application of nanotechnology to sustainable and competitive economic growth. "Nanoelectronics is certainly now the branch with the most significant commercial impact and covers a huge range of interdisciplinary areas of research and development such as Molecular electronics, Bioelectronics, Spintronics, Nanoimprint, Nanoscale Optics, Lithography, Architecture, Nanoprobes, etc..." The site features a database of nanotechnology research projects, lists of conferences and available grants, and other resources.

http://www.smalltimes.com/index.cfm
Smalltimes: big news in small tech. This web site bills itself as "the first media company devoted entirely to the fast-growing industry that includes MEMS, microsystems and nanotechnologies. As these remarkable technologies move from laboratories to the marketplace, Small Times Media will offer news coverage and industry-related trade events." An extensive collection of useful and interesting reports are grouped into categories, such as life sciences, consumer goods, environment, etc.

http://www.nickbostrom.com/
Nick Bostrom's home page offers substantial resources on the topics of "Transhumanism and the future" and "Analytic philosophy". An essay entitled The World in 2050 "explores social, political, economic and technological issues that the world may face in the mid-21st century. A central theme is the need to regulate molecular nanotechnology because of its immense abuse potential." The Transhumanist FAQ presents a 50-person collaboration "to lay the foundations for a transhumanist world view." Another essay examines the implications of machines with human level intelligence.


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Foresight Update 45 - Table of Contents

 

Credits and Kudos

Christine PetersonChris Peterson
Foresight Institute President

Foresight has reached its fifteenth anniversary without properly recognizing the efforts of so many people who've made huge donations of time over the years. In an effort to catch up, a massive awards ceremony was held at the 2001 Spring Gathering, reminiscent of the mass weddings one sees featured occasionally in the media. (Some awards were postponed until a later Gathering at which the recipient could be present.)

Foresight director Glenn Reynolds presented awards to the following:

  • David Forrest, who served for years as President of the MIT Nanotechnology Study Group, a discussion group which preceded Foresight, and who now serves as President of IMM.
  • J. Storrs Hall (a.k.a. JoSH), who founded sci.nanotech, posted Foresight publications on the net long before the web was born, and who now is an IMM Research Fellow.
  • Dave Krieger, who founded and administers the popular website Nanodot.
  • Peter McCluskey, who created open source Critmail (an improvement to Hypermail) and often helps Foresight with our websites, especially to enable site searching.
  • Ralph C. Merkle, leading computational nanotechnologist, who for years has done immense amounts of public education via lectures and media interviews.
  • Mark S. Miller, architectural advisor to the Crit project and major contributor to our computer security discussions, now the primary advocate/critic of the Open Arms proposal for open development of nanotechnology defense.
  • Ed Niehaus, who has advised Foresight on our strategy and tactics from very early on.
  • Gayle Pergamit, who from the beginning has both advised Foresight on strategy and also played a major role in selection of our top-notch paid staff.
  • Lew Phelps, who for years advised us on PR and edited Foresight Update.
  • Chris Phoenix, the primary force behind PriorArt.org (see story).
  • Carol Shaw, who first brought Foresight's financial accounts from paper to computer, and later served for years as our Chief Information Officer, thoroughly spoiling us with her seemingly-infinite expertise in software and networks.
  • Terry Stanley, architect of CritMap, an open source graphical display and interface for the navigation of web sites.
  • Ka-Ping Yee, the architect and primary force driving the open source CritLink annotation project.

At future Gatherings we plan to continue to catch up on past awards long overdue, and to keep up with new ones.

And long-time Foresight friend and Senior Associate Tom McKendree wrote us in May:

"I am extremely happy to announce that last week I passed the defense of my Ph.D. dissertation at the University of Southern California (USC), on the subject of "Technical and Operational Assessment of Molecular Nanotechnology for Space Operations". This is a rewrite of my earlier dissertation draft, making molecular nanotechnology for space the explicit central focus of the document. The basic conclusion, that systems designed and built to atomic precision can outperform current technology for space operations, should not be a surprise to this audience. The heartening aspects are that I was able to substantiate this conclusion in much more detail, and that I was able to convince a dissertation committee of six, including five lecturing professors at USC, that this was sufficiently credible and important to deserve a Ph.D."

Congratulations, Tom! Make that Dr. McKendree.


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Foresight Update 45 - Table of Contents | Page1 | Page2 | Page3 | Page4 | Page5


From Foresight Update 45, originally published 30 June 2001.



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