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Archive for the 'Open Source' Category

Will crowdsourced RNA designs advance nanotechnology?

Posted by Jim Lewis on March 6th, 2014

A very large community of online gamers has consistently produced RNA designs that outperform the best design algorithms by a large margin. Can online gamers designing RNA, protein, and other molecules contribute to the development of atomically precise manufacturing?

Open Access journals for nanotechnology and other topics

Posted by Jim Lewis on December 19th, 2013

A collection of open access journals on a variety of topics provides a very useful entry point to the rapidly growing collection of scientific, technical, and scholarly research that is not hidden behind pay walls.

Christine Peterson on pushing the future in a positive direction

Posted by Jim Lewis on February 20th, 2013

In a 47-minute interview Christine Peterson discusses the future that science and technology is bringing over the next few decades, and how to get involved to push the future in a positive direction.

Adding to the toolbox for making complex molecular machines

Posted by Jim Lewis on April 4th, 2012

A set of rationally engineered transcriptional regulators for yeast will make it easier to build complex molecular machine systems in yeast, some of which may become useful additions to pathway technologies for atomically precise manufacturing and productive nanosystems.

Crowd-sourced protein design a promising path to advanced nanotechnology

Posted by Jim Lewis on January 24th, 2012

Foldit game players have again out-performed scientists in protein design, this time improving the design of a protein designed from scratch to catalyze Diels-Alder cycloadditions.

Deadline THIS FRIDAY for early rate on Open Science Summit

Posted by Christine Peterson on September 20th, 2011

Excellent lineup of speakers again this year for the Open Science Summit, Oct. 22-23, and you can get in for only $100 if you register by this Friday:  http://opensciencesummit.com Hope to see you there!  —Christine Peterson, President, Foresight Institute

Smartphone projects foster discussion of ubiquitous surveillance

Posted by Jim Lewis on August 10th, 2011

Proposed projects to use smartphone networks to gather data and inform authorities are opening discussion of how such data should be used.

Computational circuit built from 74 small DNA molecules (with video)

Posted by Jim Lewis on June 9th, 2011

A biochemical circuit built from 74 small DNA molecules demonstrates an approach that may enable embedded control of molecular devices.

Willow Garage TurtleBot advances open source do-it-yourself robotics

Posted by Jim Lewis on April 18th, 2011

Willow Garage TurtleBot, an open source programmable robot with a 3D vision system, is available to preorder, starting at $500.

Will more efficient protein folding program advance nanotechnology?

Posted by Jim Lewis on March 29th, 2011

MIT scientists have devised much more efficient procedures for modeling protein folding in order to be able to model the folding of the flood of proteins sequences made available by modern genome sequencing methods.

Nanodot in excellent company among top 50 blogs

Posted by Jim Lewis on November 30th, 2010

A list of the “Top 50 Blogs by Scientific Researchers” includes Nanodot among blogs focusing on open source and open access, academia, projects funded by organizations, and news produced by writers who research science.

Open Science Summit videos available

Posted by Jim Lewis on October 23rd, 2010

Video footage of conference focused on “Updating the social contract for Science”

Why terrorists are often engineers: implications for nanotechnology

Posted by Christine Peterson on September 16th, 2010

An IEEE Spectrum podcast asks the question, Why Are Terrorists Often Engineers? The blurb: With terrorism back in the news, so, too, is a curious footnote: Of the hundreds of individuals involved in political violence, nearly half of those with degrees have been engineers. This finding, first published in 2008, has been substantiated by two [...]

“Science court”-style software from the CIA

Posted by Christine Peterson on August 16th, 2010

Longtime Foresight supporter John Gilmore writes: “I noticed a story that reminded me of something Foresight wanted to encourage in society.  Wired reports that the CIA uses decision analysis software ‘Analysis of Competing Hypotheses’, and has funded a rewritten version for shared networked analysis by many people.  But the gov’t contractors got into a hassle [...]

Don’t miss the Open Science Summit, July 29-31, in person or live webcast

Posted by Christine Peterson on July 19th, 2010

The Open Science Summit on July 29-31 in Berkeley is looking better and better. Topics include OpenPCR, DIY biology, open source hardware, brain preservation, synthetic biology, gene patents, open data, open access journals, reputation engines, crowd-funding and microfinance for science, citizen science, biohacking, open source biodefense, cure entrepreneurs, open source drug discovery, patent pools, tech transfer, and [...]

Willow Garage reaches robotic milestone involving beer (video)

Posted by Christine Peterson on July 9th, 2010

Finishing off the week on a fun note, we see that robotic firm Willow Garage — of special interest to Foresight due to their emphasis on open source — has achieved an important milestone in robotics: namely, the ability for a robot to fetch a beer from the fridge and deliver it. It’s worth seeing [...]

Open Science Summit to be streamed live

Posted by Christine Peterson on June 21st, 2010

Not able to attend the Open Science Summit on July 29-31 in Berkeley, California? We’ll miss you, but you can watch the conference live at: http://fora.tv/live/open_science/open_science_summit_2010 Put it on your calendar now!  Or we’ll hope to see you in person, especially for the session where I’m speaking: “Safety and Security Concerns, Open Source Biodefense” at [...]

New open-access nanotechnology journal from Beilstein

Posted by Christine Peterson on June 18th, 2010

Those of you with a background in organic chemistry will recognize the venerable name of Beilstein, originally a handbook of organic chemistry which evolved into a database, later combined with Gmelin inorganic data to form the Crossfire database. So the Beilstein brand is a powerful one in chemistry.  Nanowerk brings to our attention that Beilstein [...]

Open Science Summit 2010, July 29-31, w/ Foresight discount

Posted by Christine Peterson on May 5th, 2010

I’ll be speaking at the following event. If you miss the early registration rate, you can get 20% off regular registration with the discount code ‘Foresight’: Open Science Summit 2010: Updating the Social Contract for Science 2.0 July 29-31 International House Berkeley http://opensciencesummit.com Ready for a rapid, radical reboot of the global innovation system for [...]

Keeping computers from ending science’s reproducibility

Posted by J. Storrs Hall on January 22nd, 2010

From Ars Technica: Nobel Intent, a thought-provoking article on what the prevalence of computational science portends for reproducibility in science: Victoria Stodden is currently at Yale Law School, and she gave a short talk at the recent Science Online meeting in which she discussed the legal aspects of ensuring that the code behind computational tools [...]