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Archive for the 'Intellectual Property' Category

Deadline THIS FRIDAY for early rate on Open Science Summit

Posted by Christine Peterson on September 20th, 2011

Excellent lineup of speakers again this year for the Open Science Summit, Oct. 22-23, and you can get in for only $100 if you register by this Friday:  http://opensciencesummit.com Hope to see you there!  —Christine Peterson, President, Foresight Institute

Open Science Summit videos available

Posted by Jim Lewis on October 23rd, 2010

Video footage of conference focused on “Updating the social contract for Science”

“Science court”-style software from the CIA

Posted by Christine Peterson on August 16th, 2010

Longtime Foresight supporter John Gilmore writes: “I noticed a story that reminded me of something Foresight wanted to encourage in society.  Wired reports that the CIA uses decision analysis software ‘Analysis of Competing Hypotheses’, and has funded a rewritten version for shared networked analysis by many people.  But the gov’t contractors got into a hassle [...]

Don’t miss the Open Science Summit, July 29-31, in person or live webcast

Posted by Christine Peterson on July 19th, 2010

The Open Science Summit on July 29-31 in Berkeley is looking better and better. Topics include OpenPCR, DIY biology, open source hardware, brain preservation, synthetic biology, gene patents, open data, open access journals, reputation engines, crowd-funding and microfinance for science, citizen science, biohacking, open source biodefense, cure entrepreneurs, open source drug discovery, patent pools, tech transfer, and [...]

Open Science Summit 2010, July 29-31, w/ Foresight discount

Posted by Christine Peterson on May 5th, 2010

I’ll be speaking at the following event. If you miss the early registration rate, you can get 20% off regular registration with the discount code ‘Foresight’: Open Science Summit 2010: Updating the Social Contract for Science 2.0 July 29-31 International House Berkeley http://opensciencesummit.com Ready for a rapid, radical reboot of the global innovation system for [...]

Freitas awarded first mechanosynthesis patent

Posted by Christine Peterson on April 12th, 2010

The winner of the 2009 Foresight Feynman Prize in Nanotechnology (Theory), Robert A. Freitas Jr., has now been granted the first diamond mechanosynthesis patent.  This is not just the first DMS patent but also, I believe, the first mechanosynthesis patent that has ever been issued.  Freitas is the sole inventor on this patent, which was [...]

Is the patent system stifling nanotechnology?

Posted by Jim Lewis on October 14th, 2008

Will “blocking patents” delay nanotech advances, as has happened with biotechmedical advances?

Will open source work for nanotechnology?

Posted by Jim Lewis on September 25th, 2008

Can Open source methodology, with its promise of spreading benefits through new varieties of intellectual property, and which has played a major role in software development, also play a role in nanotech development? At least one MIT researcher, Stephen Steiner, thinks so. He is working on a web site for “open source nanotech”. Among other [...]

Nanotechnology medicine: will it be affordable?

Posted by Christine Peterson on December 17th, 2007

Those of you who subscribe to Foresight’s free Weekly News Digest (sign up using the Join Email List box at upper right of our home page) have seen that practically every week there’s new positive results to report on nanotechnology for drug delivery, especially for cancer. A summary of where to read about these advances [...]

Nanotechnology "Unconference" now open to general public

Posted by Christine Peterson on October 19th, 2007

Registration for Foresight’s Nov. 3-4 Vision Weekend focused on nanotechnology and other advanced technologies — traditionally restricted to Foresight Senior Associates — is being opened to the general public this year as an experiment. Space is limited and participants are advised to register very soon. To warm up for our Sat/Sun afternoon unconference, in the [...]

Patent office arms race will hurt nanotechnology

Posted by Christine Peterson on October 17th, 2007

There’s an arms race between government patent offices and patent filers assisted by private law firms. The folks who work for the former get paid a lot less than the those who work for the latter. This leads to a continual drain away from government review of patent applications toward private generation of patent applications. [...]

Patent peer review: now software, soon nanotechnology?

Posted by Christine Peterson on June 27th, 2007

At one of the Accelerating Change conferences I saw Prof. Beth Noveck introduce for the first time her ideas on improving patents via peer review. Now, the nanotechnology field will be envious to hear that another field has been chosen to carry out the first pilot project — software, as reported in IEEE Spectrum: The [...]

Patent Reform Act to aid nanotechnology?

Posted by Christine Peterson on June 22nd, 2007

Today’s San Jose Mercury News — the newspaper of Silicon Valley — features a guest editorial by Wirt Cook, IBM vice president and senior state executive, on the proposed Patent Reform Act, titled “Patent Reform Act best way to protect, foster innovation”: Berman’s bill will enable private-citizen-experts to help patent examiners research the novelty of [...]

Maximizing nanotechnology patent benefits

Posted by Christine Peterson on June 5th, 2007

The Bayh-Dole Act of 1980 in the U.S. gives patent rights for federally-funded research done in universities to the universities themselves, in effect. Many people regard this strategy as a succcess, and many countries around the world are copying it. But is this the best way to handle this publicly-funded intellectual property? After over 25 [...]

Nanotechnology patent problems blamed on unionization

Posted by Christine Peterson on April 9th, 2007

Small Times reports on a meeting held in Oregon among a wide variety of nanotechnology-based business participants, at which many commercialization challenges were discussed. One was difficulties encountered with the U.S. Patent office: Start-ups expressed frustration with the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO). Long waits for patent award decisions make it difficult for them [...]

Nanotechnology leading to molecular machines

Posted by Christine Peterson on March 13th, 2007

Richard Jones and commenters bring our attention to a number of enticing research papers on the use of catalysis and molecular motors to produce movement. One paper mentioned sounds particularly useful: an overview of progress on Synthetic Molecular Motors and Mechanical Machines. From the abstract: The widespread use of controlled molecular-level motion in key natural [...]

Windows Vista: potential negative impact on nanotechnology

Posted by Christine Peterson on February 12th, 2007

John Walker brings to our attention an apparently distressing set of concerns regarding the new version of Windows, known as Vista, written up by Peter Gutman as A Cost Analysis of Windows Vista Content Protection. Excerpts: The only way to protect the HFS [Hardware Functionality Scan] process therefore is to not release any technical details [...]

Nanotechnology robotic arm built at NYU

Posted by Christine Peterson on December 13th, 2006

NYU prof Nadrian Seeman, who won the Foresight Institute Feynman Prize back in 1995, has done it again. From Science Daily: New York University chemistry professor Nadrian C. Seeman and his graduate student Baoquan Ding have developed a DNA cassette through which a nanomechanical device can be inserted and function within a DNA array, allowing [...]

Nanotechnology patent delays bad for (almost) everyone

Posted by Christine Peterson on November 27th, 2006

A story by Jon Van describes the growing backlog of nanotechnology patent applications: As the time it takes to process patent applications now averages almost four years, double the time it took in 2004, nanotech entrepreneurs are beginning to worry that their ability to raise money to develop products may be stifled. It’s not just [...]

Patents on fundamental nanotechnology devices may slow progress

Posted by Christine Peterson on October 25th, 2006

First, the good news. Here’s an update from Physorg.com on the nanoactuator work reported previously. Not much new technical info, but new thoughts on cool applications: Researchers at the University of Portsmouth, UK, have developed an electronic switch based on DNA – a world-first bio-nanotechnology breakthrough that provides the foundation for the interface between living [...]