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Archive for the 'Molecular Nanotechnology' Category

Architecture for atomically precise quantum computer in silicon

Posted by Jim Lewis on November 9th, 2015

Building on previous work on single atom transistors and single atom qubits, Australian researchers have incorporated a quantum error correction code to make possible a scalable 3D silicon chip architecture that could lead to operational quantum computers.

One-directional rotation in a new artificial molecular motor

Posted by Jim Lewis on November 5th, 2015

Independent rotation of two wheels attached to either end of an axle has been achieved in a light-driven artificial molecular motor, suggesting a basis for a nanometer-scale transport system.

DNA nanomachine lights up to diagnose diseases

Posted by Jim Lewis on November 2nd, 2015

DNA nanotechnology produces an artificial molecular machine that changes shape when it encounters a specific antibody or other protein molecule, and emits light to signal the target’s presence.

Chirality-assisted synthesis a new tool for nanotechnology

Posted by Jim Lewis on October 30th, 2015

A novel application of supramolecular chemistry allows molecules to join in only one direction, providing a new way to control the shape of large molecules.

Surface assisted self-assembly of DNA origami nanostructures

Posted by Jim Lewis on October 26th, 2015

A lipid bilayer supported by a mica surface assisted the mobile self-assembly of DNA nanostructures of various shapes into micrometer-scale 2D lattices.

Free online edition of The Feynman Lectures on Physics

Posted by Jim Lewis on October 25th, 2015

A free to read online edition of the classic 3-volume physics text developed from Richard Feynman’s legendary Cal Tech physics lectures, specially designed for online reading, has been made available by the California Institute of Technology and the Feynman Lectures Website.

Conference video: New Methods of Exploring, Analyzing, and Predicting Molecular Interactions

Posted by Jim Lewis on October 8th, 2015

Prof. Art Olson discussed how we understand what we cannot see directly, how we integrate data from different sources, and how to develop software tools to move forward.

Foresight co-founder on the future of the human lifespan

Posted by Jim Lewis on October 6th, 2015

Optimized Geek podcast featured Christine Peterson on the future of nanotechnology, human lifespan, artificial intelligence, finding love, and other topics.

DNA nanotechnology guides assembling cells into 'Organoids'

Posted by Jim Lewis on September 30th, 2015

DNA strands decorating cell membranes like ‘Velcro’ program the adhesion of cells to other cells or to extracellular matrices to build tiny tissue models.

Atomically precise boron doping of graphene nanoribbons

Posted by Jim Lewis on September 28th, 2015

The ability to dope graphene nanoribbons with boron atoms to atomic precision opens a range of possible new applications, from chemical sensing to nanoelectronics to photocatalysis to battery electrodes.

Parallel to protein folding improves DNA origami process

Posted by Jim Lewis on September 27th, 2015

Designing a small DNA origami that can fold in several almost equivalent ways demonstrates how understanding and guiding the folding pathway can improve the efficiency of the folding process, potentially leading in more complex situations to higher yields of the desired nanostructure and fewer misfolded structures.

Review of artificial molecular machines and their controlled motions

Posted by Jim Lewis on September 18th, 2015

An extensive review of artificial molecular machines, their large-amplitude motions, and the changes these motions produce, emphasizes small molecules and the central role of chemistry in their design and operation.

Conference video: Bringing Computational Programmability to Nanostructured Surfaces

Posted by Jim Lewis on September 11th, 2015

Dr. Alex Wissner-Gross surveyed the interplay between programmability of bits and atoms in the development of technology, asking how the recent successes with programming bits can help nanotechnology progress in programming atoms.

Addressable molecular machines arranged in a porous crystal

Posted by Jim Lewis on September 10th, 2015

Simple molecular switches based upon bistable mechanically interlocked molecules can be incorporated within pre-assembled metal organic frameworks and addressed electrochemically.

Overview of molecular machines documents recent progress

Posted by Jim Lewis on September 4th, 2015

A review of molecular parts that act as switches, motors, and ratchets illuminates similarities between artificial and biological molecular machines and argues that useful applications are coming.

Macroscopic mechanical manipulation controls molecular machine array

Posted by Jim Lewis on September 1st, 2015

A pliers-shaped molecule in which two covalently linked naphthalene moieties serve as the hinge connecting the two halves of the pliers, and each naphthalene connects the hydrophobic handle with the hydrophilic jaw of that half, opens and closes in response to surprisingly little energy applied to a molecular monolayer.

Novel wireframe nanostructures from new DNA origami design process

Posted by Jim Lewis on August 18th, 2015

A new set of design rules enables constructing any wireframe nanostructure, which may lead to new medical applications and new nanomachines.

Conference video: Artificial Biochemistry with DNA

Posted by Jim Lewis on August 13th, 2015

Modeling DNA strand displacement cascades according to three simple rules can in principle mimic the temporal dynamics of any other chemical system, presenting a method to model regulatory networks even more complicated than those of biology.

Ribosome subunits tethered to make versatile artificial molecular machine

Posted by Jim Lewis on August 11th, 2015

Functional ribosomes with subunits engineered to not separate at the completion of each protein translation cycle make possible engineering systems to make a variety of novel polymers with novel properties.

Automated design of polyhedral meshes for DNA origami

Posted by Jim Lewis on August 7th, 2015

An automated design process folds arbitrary meshes to produce DNA origami structures difficult to design by previous methods, including more open structures that are stable in ionic conditions used in biological assays.