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Archive for the 'Molecular Nanotechnology' Category

Single molecule pump concentrates small molecules

Posted by Jim Lewis on May 26th, 2015

A rotaxane-based single molecule pump combines cycling oxidation-reduction potential of the solution with kinetic barriers to moving backward to concentrate small ring molecules against an energy gradient.

Science and technology roadmaps for nanotechnology

Posted by Jim Lewis on May 3rd, 2015

A European Science and Technology Roadmap for Graphene, Related Two-Dimensional Crystals, and Hybrid Systems hints at the opportunities to be harvested from, and the need for, the development of atomically precise manufacturing (APM).

Foresight Institute Awards Feynman Prizes in Nanotechnology to Amanda S. Barnard, Joseph W. Lyding

Posted by Jim Lewis on April 23rd, 2015

The Theory Prize was given for research into diamond nanoparticles; the Experimental Prize was given for development of scanning tunneling microscope (STM) technology.

Solid-phase synthesis of custom-made DNA nanotubes

Posted by Jim Lewis on April 9th, 2015

Single-molecule spectroscopy makes possible adding one rung at a time to a foundational rung grafted to a surface to make a long nanotube scaffold of predetermined sequence.

DNA nanoswitches open window on molecular interactions

Posted by Jim Lewis on April 5th, 2015

Positioning two or more molecules along a long DNA strand can cause the DNA molecule to adopt different shapes if the molecules interact. Quickly and cheaply separating these shapes by a simple gel electrophoresis assay provides a wealth of information about how the molecules interact.

New scaffold for nanotechnology engineered from amyloid-like proteins

Posted by Jim Lewis on April 4th, 2015

Design and computational simulation of amyloid proteins of diverse functions from diverse sources enable the self-assembly of proteins that could provide scaffolds for diverse applications.

Cotranscriptional folding of single RNA strand added to nanotechnology toolkit

Posted by Jim Lewis on March 31st, 2015

RNA origami brings new dimensions to nucleic acid nanotechnology by exploiting the much greater variety of RNA structural motifs (compared to DNA) to do what cannot easily be done with DNA origami, like fold into predetermined nanostructures rapidly while being transcribed.

Automated synthesis expands nanotechnology building block repertoire

Posted by Jim Lewis on March 24th, 2015

Iterative coupling, purification, and cyclization of a large collection of organic building blocks promises a vast array of complex small and medium sized molecules as candidates for drug discovery, catalysis, and nanotechnology.

Atomically precise manufacturing as the future of nanotechnology

Posted by Jim Lewis on March 8th, 2015

A commentary over at Gizmodo argues that ideas about molecular manufacturing that sounded like science fiction in 1986 now sound more like science fact.

Are nanorobots and atomically precise manufacturing becoming mainstream nanotechnology?

Posted by Jim Lewis on March 7th, 2015

The idea that nanorobots fabricated by atomically precise manufacturing processes are a likely part of our future, and that this is a good thing, is appearing more frequently, largely as a result of Drexler’s recent book Radical Abundance.

Designing mechanical functions into DNA nanotechnology

Posted by Jim Lewis on March 3rd, 2015

An overview of three decades of progress in DNA nanotechnology emphasizes bringing programmed motion to DNA nanostructures, including efforts to incorporate design principles from macroscopic mechanical engineering.

A tunable hinge joint for DNA nanotechnology

Posted by Jim Lewis on January 31st, 2015

Variable length single-stranded DNA springs determine how far a hinge of double-stranded DNA joining two stiff sections of DNA origami can bend.

Structural DNA nanotechnology with programmed motions

Posted by Jim Lewis on January 28th, 2015

Scaffolded DNA origami is combined with hinges of single- or double-stranded DNA to built simple machines parts that have been combined to program simple to complex motions.

What sort of abundance will nanotechnology bring?

Posted by Jim Lewis on January 11th, 2015

One example is presented of how well the meme is spreading that nanotechnology will evolve toward atomically precise manufacturing that will in turn bring forth a world of abundance.

Swarms of DNA nanorobots execute complex tasks in living animal

Posted by Jim Lewis on January 6th, 2015

Combinations of different types of DNA nanorobots, implementing different logic gates, work together to tag a specific type of cell in a living cockroach depending on the presence or absence of two protein signals.

Small molecule nanorobot walks through a protein nanopore

Posted by Jim Lewis on December 30th, 2014

Among the smallest molecular robots reported so far, a walker based on phenylarsonous acid with two organic thiol ligands as feet walks through a one-nanometer-diameter protein nanopore channel by taking 0.6 nanometer steps, by thiol exchange, from one cysteine residue to the next.

Computational framework for structural DNA nanotechnology

Posted by Jim Lewis on December 27th, 2014

A more general computational framework predicts the structures of 2D and 3D-curved DNA nanostructures impossible to predict using previously available computational methods. May lead to 3D-printing DNA nanostructures?

New way to couple carbon atoms yields novel molecular architectures

Posted by Jim Lewis on December 24th, 2014

A new strategy to form bonds between carbon atoms opens the way to a wide variety of molecular architectures that had been difficult or impossible to access using previous methods.

Artificial enzymes created from building blocks not found in nature

Posted by Jim Lewis on December 22nd, 2014

Artificial enzymes have been created from nucleic acids that use synthetic molecules instead of ribose or deoxyribose sugars.

Large, open protein cages designed and built

Posted by Jim Lewis on December 7th, 2014

Design principles have been developed and tested to construct novel synthetic protein monomers that can self-assemble into large, open protein cages for potential use in vaccines and drug delivery.