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Archive for the 'Nanoscale Bulk Technologies' Category

Another powerful nanoengine remembered

Posted by Jim Lewis on July 11th, 2016

The claim that the recently reported actuating nanotransducers (ANTS) produce forces “orders of magnitude larger than any produced previously” is challenged by a nanocrystal carbon nanotube device reported 11 years ago.

Powerful nanoengine built from coated nanoparticles

Posted by Jim Lewis on June 5th, 2016

A nanoengine 100 times more powerful than known nanomotors and muscles was demonstrated using the aggregation and dispersal of gold nanoparticles coated with a polymer that undergoes a rapid transition from hydrophobic to hydrophilic.

Nanotechnologies to advance solar energy utilization

Posted by Jim Lewis on March 25th, 2016

Increasing efficiency and utilization and lowering costs for harvesting, converting, transporting, and storing energy produced from sunlight provides a showcase for a variety of nanoscale materials, structures, and processes.

DNA nanotechnology provides new ways to arrange nanoparticles into crystal lattices

Posted by Jim Lewis on February 19th, 2016

Two research teams present two different methods for using single strands of DNA to link various nanoparticles into complex 3D arrays: one using DNA hairpins for dynamic reconfiguration and the other using a DNA origami scaffold.

Roles of materials research and polymer chemistry in developing nanotechnology

Posted by Jim Lewis on February 16th, 2016

Polymer chemistry and materials research provide opportunities to explore structures that harmonize phenomena unique to nanoscale technology, the role of mechanical forces generated at interfaces, and the responses of biological systems to mechanical stresses.

Electron tomography reveals precise positions of individual atoms in aperiodic material

Posted by Jim Lewis on January 11th, 2016

The positions of 3769 tungsten atoms in a tungsten needle segment were determined to a precision of 19 pm (0.019 nm), including the position of a single atom defect in the interior of the sample, by using aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy and computerized tomography.

Nanoparticles ameliorate MS in mice by inducing immune tolerance of myelin

Posted by Jim Lewis on January 7th, 2016

In the first mouse model of the progressive form of multiple sclerosis, nanoparticles that created immune tolerance to myelin prevented the development of progressive MS.

Active and reversible control of nanoparticle optical properties

Posted by Jim Lewis on January 3rd, 2016

Electrochemically modifying individual metallic nanoparticles and pairs of such nanoparticles enabled reversible tuning of their optical properties, including charge transfer plasmon formation in nanoparticle pairs.

Rolling DNA-based motors increase nano-walker speeds 1000-fold

Posted by Jim Lewis on December 12th, 2015

Coating micrometer-sized glass spheres with hundreds of DNA strands complementary to an RNA covering a glass slide enables the sphere to move, with the help of an enzyme that digests RNA bound to complementary DNA, a thousand times faster than conventional DNA-walkers.

Octopodal nanoparticles combine catalytic, plasmonic functions

Posted by Jim Lewis on December 11th, 2015

Eight-armed nanoparticles of gold coated with a gold-palladium alloy proved to be both efficient plasmonic sensors and efficient catalysts, even though gold alone is not normally a good catalyst and palladium is a poor plasmonic material.

Novel nanoconjugate delivers synergistic combination of microRNAs to treat cancer

Posted by Jim Lewis on December 11th, 2015

Two microRNAs with synergistic effects, one that suppresses tumor growth and another than inhibits tumor promotion, are combined in an RNA triple helix, complexed with a dendrimer to form nanoparticles, which are incorporated with a polymer to form a hydrogel that inhibits tumor growth when applied to the tumor.

Ultrasensitive microRNA assay with nanosensor to detect cancer

Posted by Jim Lewis on December 10th, 2015

A nanotechnology-based sensor provides fast, inexpensive, ultrasensitive assay of microRNA pattern to detect cancer using DNA immobilized on a synthetic gold nanoprism.

Atomic precision in sculpting 3-D objects

Posted by Jim Lewis on December 3rd, 2015

Nanometer-level control of the beam path of a scanning transmission electron microscope nudges an amorphous material into atomically precise epitaxial growth.

Generating hydrogen with single atom catalysts

Posted by Jim Lewis on November 13th, 2015

Single cobalt atoms have been positioned in nitrogen-doped graphene to catalytically produce hydrogen from water almost as effectively as using vastly more expensive platinum catalysts.

Catalytic micromotors demonstrate carbon dioxide removal from water

Posted by Jim Lewis on September 29th, 2015

A micromotor covered with the enzyme carbonic anhydrase zips through water rapidly converting dissolved carbon dioxide to the bicarbonate ion, which can then be precipitated as calcium carbonate.

Nanotechnology provides sensors for liver-on-chip drug testing

Posted by Jim Lewis on September 2nd, 2015

Adding nanotechnology-based optoelectronic sensors to human cells cultured on a chip keeps the cells healthy long enough to replace animal testing with a human liver-on-a-chip.

Femtosecond imaging with near nanometer spatial resolution

Posted by Jim Lewis on August 31st, 2015

Analysis of multiple diffraction images provides high contrast, high quality, full field 3D imaging of surfaces illuminated by extreme ultraviolet photons from a tabletop laser.

A tunable bandgap by doping a few atomic layers of black phosphorous

Posted by Jim Lewis on August 29th, 2015

A vertical electrical field from dopant atoms of potassium added to the surface of a few stacked layers of phosphorene tunes the band gap of black phosphorous, possibly leading to novel electronic and optoelectronic devices.

Another nanotechnology computer memory breakthrough from Feynman Prize winner

Posted by Jim Lewis on August 12th, 2015

A novel nanostructured material based on tantalum oxide could make possible non-volatile crossbar array memories that store up to 162 gigabits in 3-D memory stacks.

Wafer-scale atomically precise thin layers for nanotechnology

Posted by Jim Lewis on June 30th, 2015

By precise control of several factors, uniform high-performance monolayers of the semiconductor MoS2 have been obtained and used to fabricate field-effect transistors.