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Archive for the 'Nanoscale Bulk Technologies' Category

Nanotechnology provides sensors for liver-on-chip drug testing

Posted by Jim Lewis on September 2nd, 2015

Adding nanotechnology-based optoelectronic sensors to human cells cultured on a chip keeps the cells healthy long enough to replace animal testing with a human liver-on-a-chip.

Femtosecond imaging with near nanometer spatial resolution

Posted by Jim Lewis on August 31st, 2015

Analysis of multiple diffraction images provides high contrast, high quality, full field 3D imaging of surfaces illuminated by extreme ultraviolet photons from a tabletop laser.

A tunable bandgap by doping a few atomic layers of black phosphorous

Posted by Jim Lewis on August 29th, 2015

A vertical electrical field from dopant atoms of potassium added to the surface of a few stacked layers of phosphorene tunes the band gap of black phosphorous, possibly leading to novel electronic and optoelectronic devices.

Another nanotechnology computer memory breakthrough from Feynman Prize winner

Posted by Jim Lewis on August 12th, 2015

A novel nanostructured material based on tantalum oxide could make possible non-volatile crossbar array memories that store up to 162 gigabits in 3-D memory stacks.

Wafer-scale atomically precise thin layers for nanotechnology

Posted by Jim Lewis on June 30th, 2015

By precise control of several factors, uniform high-performance monolayers of the semiconductor MoS2 have been obtained and used to fabricate field-effect transistors.

Self-assembly of silicon metamaterial for nanoscale reflectors

Posted by Stephanie C on June 25th, 2015

Recently highlighted in a C&EN article titled Simple Process Creates Near-Perfect Mirrors Out of a Metamaterial, researchers out of Vanderbilt University developed a method to self-assemble silicon nanostructures to achieve highly (Bragg-like) reflective mirrors which capitalize on nanoscale properties not present in bulk structures. The self-assembly method is far simpler than previous, conventional electron beam [...]

Computational nanotechnology reveals complex interactions in double-walled carbon nanotubes

Posted by Jim Lewis on June 8th, 2015

Density functional theory calculations of the electronic properties of double-walled carbon nanotubes (DWCNTs) comprising two concentric zigzag tubes of different chiralities reveal complex effects upon the electronic band gap, identifying candidate combinations for diverse applications from transistors to macroscopic conducting wires.

Arrays of pure semiconducting carbon nanotubes for nanoelectronics

Posted by Jim Lewis on June 6th, 2015

A very efficient and scalable method of completely removing metallic carbon nanotubes from mixtures of metallic and semiconducting carbon nanotubes produces arrays suitable for many applications and for studies of thin film transistors.

Conference video: Multi-Million Atom Simulations for Single Atom Transistor Structures

Posted by Jim Lewis on May 12th, 2015

At the 2013 Conference Gerhard Klimeck presented the work of his computational nanotechnology network modeling nanoelectronic devices, using simulations of multi-million atom domains to understand the function of single atom devices embedded in larger nanostructures.

Nanoparticles shepherd DNA into cells to regulate immune response

Posted by Jim Lewis on May 6th, 2015

DNA sequences designed to either stimulate a specific immune response or to down-regulate an undesirable response deliver superior performance when organized on nanoparticles to reach their intended cellular targets.

Nanowires and bacteria harnessed for artificial photosynthesis

Posted by Jim Lewis on May 4th, 2015

A prototype system to produce chemicals and fuels from sequestered carbon dioxide, water, and sunlight uses semiconductor nanowires to produce electron-hole pairs, which are then used by two types of bacteria to produce oxygen and a variety of useful chemical products.

Science and technology roadmaps for nanotechnology

Posted by Jim Lewis on May 3rd, 2015

A European Science and Technology Roadmap for Graphene, Related Two-Dimensional Crystals, and Hybrid Systems hints at the opportunities to be harvested from, and the need for, the development of atomically precise manufacturing (APM).

Nanothreads formed from smallest possible diamonds

Posted by Jim Lewis on May 2nd, 2015

A new form of carbon produced by very slowly releasing benzene compressed at 200,000 times atmospheric pressure may be the strongest material possible.

UK SuperSTEM facility advances imaging and analysis of materials

Posted by Jim Lewis on April 30th, 2015

Advanced aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopes in UK facility provide atomically precise characterization of a variety of materials to guide R&D in alloys, drug delivery, lasers and other areas.

Gold nanotubes engineered for diagnosis and therapy

Posted by Jim Lewis on April 30th, 2015

Gold nanotubes engineered to a specified length, modified surfaces, and to have other desirable characteristics showed expected abilities to enter tumor cells in laboratory studies, and to distribute to tissues within live mice as intended.

Flexible supercapacitor from stacked nanomaterial

Posted by Jim Lewis on April 8th, 2015

A nanoporous form of graphene made by burning off other elements from an inexpensive polymer has been used to fabricate flexible supercapacitors via a process that can be scaled to industrial quantities to provide energy storage for wearable, flexible electronics.

Targeted nanoparticles deliver molecules to resolve atherosclerotic inflammation

Posted by Jim Lewis on March 9th, 2015

In tests in a mouse model of advanced atherosclerosis, core-shell nanoparticles, composed of block copolymers and targeted to sites of inflammation and vascular injury, delivered a bioactive peptide that improved key properties of advanced plaques.

Small, fast, electrically-driven nanomotors

Posted by Jim Lewis on March 5th, 2015

Bulk nanoscale technologies were used to create three-segment nanowires of gold and nickel, and magnetic bearings of gold, nickel, and chromium. Combinations of DC and AC electric fields were used to assemble nanomotors that can spin at speeds up to 18,000r.p.m., and for up to 15 hours.

Nanotechnology making 3D transistors by directed molecular self-assembly

Posted by Jim Lewis on March 1st, 2015

IBM researchers engineered a class of molecules called block copolymers to self-assemble into dense patterns to extend the capabilities of photolithography.

Mixing two types of nanoparticle triggers structure change

Posted by Jim Lewis on February 5th, 2015

Mixing two different types of cylindrical nanoparticles causes them to reorganize into smaller spherical nanoparticles. A mechanism to release drugs only inside cells that internalize both types?