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Archive for the 'Nanoscale Bulk Technologies' Category

Nanoparticle therapy for incurable brain cancer effective in mice

Posted by Jim Lewis on November 15th, 2013

Gold nanoparticles densely coated with RNA molecules intended to silence a gene essential for an incurable brain cancer proved effective in mice engrafted with human glioblastoma multiforme tumor.

Carbyne: the strongest, stiffest carbon chain

Posted by Stephanie C on October 11th, 2013

Carbyne – a straight line of carbon atoms linked by double bonds or by alternating single and triple bonds — is the next stiff, carbon-based structure with unusual and desirable properties. It has been observed under limited natural and experimental conditions, is expected to be difficult to synthesize and store, and now has been theoretically [...]

Nanotubes aren't stiff if they aren't straight

Posted by Stephanie C on October 3rd, 2013

Materials scientists have pursued the question of why vertically aligned carbon nanotube forests show much lower modulus values than expected. Now researchers from Georgia Tech have found that the nanotubes they fabricate contain kinks that dramatically diminish modulus value. In other words, the nanotubes are not straight; therefore, they are not stiff. The government-funded research [...]

Foresight Invitational Workshop: Nanotechnology for Developing Countries

Posted by Jim Lewis on September 30th, 2013

An invitational workshop to address the opportunities and challenges of nanotechnology for developing countries will be held in parallel with Foresight’s open nanotechnology conference “The Integration Conference”.

Building a hub for nanotech advancement

Posted by Stephanie C on September 17th, 2013

Nanotechnology draws from physics, chemistry, engineering, computation, etc., and this multi-disciplinary nature has served as a major speed bump in achievement of envisioned nanotech goals. There has been substantial concern that the U.S. is lagging behind other countries in nanotech R&D. Now researchers, companies, and politicians are coming together to create a much-needed physical hub [...]

Circuits of graphitic nanoribbons grown from aligned DNA templates

Posted by Jim Lewis on September 17th, 2013

How complex could circuits be made using precisely positioned DNA nanostructures as templates to grow graphene nanoribbons?

Precise mechanical manipulation of individual long DNA molecules

Posted by Jim Lewis on September 12th, 2013

“Molecular threading”, a nanotechnology developed by Halcyon Molecular and now owned by Aeon Biowares, enables precise placement of individual long molecules of DNA, either for sequencing or for nanofabrication of novel DNA nanostructures.

Next Foresight Conference on Nanotechnology in February 2014

Posted by Jim Lewis on August 28th, 2013

The Conference to be held February 7-9, 2014 in Palo Alto, California will emphasize the integration of nano-engineered devices and materials into larger, more complex systems.

Nanocrystal-in-glass composite controlled by voltage

Posted by Jim Lewis on August 23rd, 2013

Covalent bonding of nanocrystals into a glass makes the glass ‘smart’ enough to transmit heat, light, both, or neither as desired.

Improved molecular targeting via cellular automata

Posted by Stephanie C on August 12th, 2013

In simplest terms, cellular automata can be thought of as groups of ‘cells’ in which the state of an individual cell will flip depending on the states of its neighbors. A ‘cell’ can be a pixel, a molecule, etc. The mathematical rules associated with cellular automation are complex and have been applied to fields as [...]

Nanoscale box aids single-molecule optical detection

Posted by Stephanie C on July 29th, 2013

Good old fashioned boxes are here to stay, even in the context of nanoscale devices. Across a broad range of technologies and size regimes, boxes serve as containers for components, barriers against contaminants and/or radiation, and, as in the case of cell membranes, can be permeable to allow selected interactions between the interior and exterior. [...]

DNA nanotechnology positions components to optimize single-molecule fluorescence

Posted by Jim Lewis on July 19th, 2013

A pillar constructed and positioned using DNA nanotechnology holds two gold nanoparticles and a dye molecule to enhance fluorescence over a hundred fold.

Nanotechnology, optical lithography, and petabyte data storage media

Posted by Jim Lewis on July 16th, 2013

Two current-day nanotechnologies using two-different optical techniques and two different media will soon make possible petabyte data storage media, in one case with 100,000 times the storage lifetime of current optical disks.

Quantum dot conduction impacted by stoichiometry, not dangling bonds

Posted by Stephanie C on May 29th, 2013

Quantum dots are semiconducting, nanoscale clusters that show electronic characteristics distinct from both bulk-scale materials and single molecules. Their special characteristics make quantum dots attractive for a broad range of potential applications, including photovoltaics and nanoscale transistors. The size and shape of quantum dots impact electrical properties and can therefore be used to tune the [...]

Germanane: germanium's answer to graphane

Posted by Stephanie C on May 15th, 2013

Soon after graphene sheets were being produced on a laboratory scale routinely, researchers began producing the hydrogenated version graphane (with a hydrogen atom on each carbon). This step is one of many approaches aimed at harnessing graphene’s powerful conductivity and is also being explored for hydrogen storage and other potential applications (more info in this [...]

Silicene: silicon's answer to graphene

Posted by Stephanie C on May 1st, 2013

**Updates: July 2014 — Research out of Argonne National Lab suggested that silicene may have never actually been successfully synthesized, rather that spectra indicate a mixture of silicon and silicon-substrate alloy; see article on Phys.org. August 2014 — Research out of Italy suggests that their spectra establish the presence of silicene though not in a [...]

Superparamagnetism-explicated-for us

Posted by Stephanie C on April 17th, 2013

Even though the sound of it is something quite atrocious, superparamagnetism may become a familiar term in the context of nanoscale electronics and devices. Loosely speaking, superparamagnetism is a size-based phenomenon in which materials that are ferromagnetic on the macroscale — meaning predisposed toward strong magnetization at room temperature, such as iron and nickel — [...]

New advancement in 3D imaging of nanoparticles at atomic resolution

Posted by Stephanie C on March 28th, 2013

Researchers from UCLA’s California NanoSystems Institute and Northwestern University have combined multiple imaging techniques to produce high quality 3D images of platinum nanoparticles, allowing advanced visualization of atomic-scale structural defects (an important advancement over X-ray crystallography). The original 2012 work, published in Nature and posted by Jim Lewis here, used electron tomography to study 10-nm [...]

Computationally designed peptide sneaks nanoparticles past immune system

Posted by Jim Lewis on March 15th, 2013

Nanoparticles decorated to avoid immune system recognition were tested in mice and shown to survive longer and deliver more imaging dye and drug to tumor cells.

Proposed Brain Activity Map may also advance nanotechnology

Posted by Jim Lewis on March 1st, 2013

A proposed large project to produce a dynamic map of the functional connectome of the human brain will require a convergence of neuroscience, biotechnology, nanotechnology, and computation, and may therefore spur the development of advanced nanotechnology leading to molecular manufacturing.