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Archive for the 'Nanoscale Bulk Technologies' Category

Will piezoelectric graphene provide options for nanoscale manipulation?

Posted by Jim Lewis on April 25th, 2012

Calculations using density functional theory have demonstrated that graphene can be made piezoelectric by adsorbing atoms or molecules on one surface, or by adsorbing different atoms or molecules on each surface.

Gold nanostars shuttled to cancer cell nucleus to release drug

Posted by Jim Lewis on April 24th, 2012

Gold nanostars targeted to a protein over-expressed in most cancer cells are shuttled by that protein directly to the cancer cell nucleus where illumination with a laser light releases a drug that deforms the nucleus and kills the cell.

Nanoparticles reduce tumors in clinical trial

Posted by Jim Lewis on April 17th, 2012

Clinical trials in patients with advanced or metastatic tumors using targeted nanoparticles to deliver a standard chemotherapeutic drug showed tumor shrinkage, even in the case of cancers for which that drug is not normally effective.

Fast nanoscale 3D-printing (link to video)

Posted by Jim Lewis on April 12th, 2012

A new two-photon polymerization process enables fast printing of arbitrarily complex three dimensional objects with 100-nanometer resolution.

Nanostructured adhesive can hold up to 700 pounds on glass

Posted by Jim Lewis on March 31st, 2012

A hand-sized adhesive inspired by the skin and tendon morphology of a gecko provides an easily reversible force capable of holding 700 pounds on a glass surface.

Nanotechnology regrows blood vessels after ischemic damage

Posted by Jim Lewis on March 26th, 2012

In a rat model of ischemic damage, nanoparticle delivery of a growth factor and a coreceptor promotes regrowth of damaged blood vessels in seven days.

Faster, less expensive medical diagnostics through nanotechnology

Posted by Jim Lewis on March 23rd, 2012

New protein repellent coating enhances the speed of carbon nanotube-based biosensors, pointing the way to faster, cheaper medical diagnostics.

Carbon Nanotubes Help Renewable Energy Industry by Improving Wind Turbine Durability

Posted by Jim Lewis on March 16th, 2012

Composites made with small amounts of multi-walled carbon nanotubes improve wind turbine blades by reducing mass while retaining strength.

Nanotechnology, DNA sequencing, and personalized medicine

Posted by Jim Lewis on February 20th, 2012

Artist’s conception of a nanopore drilled into a layer of graphene to speed up DNA sequencing. One of the greatest promises of near-term nanotechnoloogy is cheaper DNA sequencing to speed the development of personalized medicine. There are not only genetic differences between different patients, but also genetic differences between, for example, different cancers of the [...]

Graphene heterostructures may lead to graphene-based computer chips

Posted by Jim Lewis on February 12th, 2012

A field-effect tunneling transistor comprising a vertical heterostructure of atomically thin layers of graphene and boron nitride or molybdenum disulfide may pave the way for computer chips based on graphene nanotechnology.

Current nanotechnology too cool to ignore

Posted by Jim Lewis on February 10th, 2012

ideo of a superhydrophobic spray-on coating shows chocolate syrup shooting off a white shoe leaving it spotless.

Panel recommends research to manage health and environmental risks of nanomaterials

Posted by Jim Lewis on January 28th, 2012

A National Academy of Sciences panel has recommended a four-part research effort focused on preventing and managing any potential health and environmental risks of nanomaterials.

First Master's of Science in Nanomedicine degree program in US announced

Posted by Jim Lewis on January 6th, 2012

The first Master’s of Science in Nanomedicine degree program in US is announced. As an example of the rapidly developing potential of nanomedicine, a novel type of nanoparticle succeeded in two different mouse models in destroying a type of brain cancer that had previously been completely resistant to all treatment attempts.

Mechanical pressure produces atomically-precise, multifunctional 2D sheets

Posted by Jim Lewis on December 26th, 2011

Protein-like structures called peptoids can be formed into stable, free-floating nanosheets.

Christine Peterson on current state and future potential of nanotechnology

Posted by Jim Lewis on December 21st, 2011

When can we expect advanced nanomachinery to be commercialized? Will any technologies not be affected in some way by advanced nanotechnology?

Turning nanoparticles into multicomponent three-dimensional nanostructures

Posted by Jim Lewis on December 12th, 2011

Controlling the chemical processes of corrosion and plating at the nanoscale has been used to fabricate from inorganic nanoparticles complex three-dimensional objects with hollow interiors.

Lecture by Eric Drexler at Oxford on physical law and the future of nanotechnology (video)

Posted by Jim Lewis on December 6th, 2011

In a lecture at Oxford Eric Drexler argued that atomically precise manufacturing will be the next great revolution in the material basis of civilization, and discussed how we can establish reliable knowledge about key aspects of such technologies.

New light-sensitive polymer to control drug release from nanoparticles

Posted by Jim Lewis on December 4th, 2011

A new polymer that disintegrates in response to harmless radiation that can penetrate several inches into human tissue may lead to nanoparticles that release their drug cargo only at a desired time and place.

Darpa seeks nanotechnology defense against novel pathogens

Posted by Jim Lewis on November 30th, 2011

To counter the threat of evolved or engineered resistance of pathogenic bacteria to antibiotics, Darpa proposes to use nanotechnology to develop “Rapidly Adaptable Nanotherapeutics”.

Will new piezoelectric materials lead to new tools for nanotechnology?

Posted by Jim Lewis on November 27th, 2011

Will the integration of a single-crystal material with “giant” piezoelectric properties onto silicon make possible scanning probe microscopes on a chip?