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Archive for the 'Economics' Category

Nanotechnology risks? Ask the economists

Posted by Christine Peterson on October 24th, 2006

Darrell Dvorak at MidwestBusiness.com points out that there’s often some expertise missing from discussions on nanotech risk: Because nanotech operates at the molecular level, there has been much speculation about new, unknown risks of nano products and processes… An encouraging development for a fact-based approach is that regulation has been shown to often hurt more [...]

Nanotechnology: alleviate poverty or reduce inequality?

Posted by Christine Peterson on August 2nd, 2006

The role of nanotechnology in the developing world is questioned by Prof. Guillermo Foladori of Mexico in his Nanotechnology Law & Business article “Nanotechnology in Latin America at the Crossroads” (free abstract, full PDF requires a fee or subscription). Prof. Foladori reminds us of nanotech’s potential to alleviate poverty: In recent years, governments, scientists, and [...]

Wise nanoeducation investment or nano-pork?

Posted by Christine Peterson on May 23rd, 2006

Given the increasing protest from U.S. voters over the growing problem of “pork” spending by Congress, it behooves us in the nanotech field to develop criteria for nanotech projects. Here’s an example from the May 2006 Forbes/Wolfe Nanotech Report (similar report in Milwaukee Business Journal): “Department of Commerce Funding: Chippewa Valley Technical College Funding Announced: [...]

New nanotech export controls opposed

Posted by Christine Peterson on May 17th, 2006

The leading semiconductor equipment industry association has taken a strong stand (one-page pdf) against new U.S. nanotech export controls: “SEMI is concerned about possible new export controls on nanotechnology products and cautions against further controls until this technology is better defined. “Nanotechnology should not be controlled simply because it is nanotechnology. This label is often [...]

Nanotech moves into the automobile

Posted by Christine Peterson on May 16th, 2006

Nanofilm president (and Foresight participating member) Scott Rickert writes in Industry Week of the changes taking place as nanotechnology moves into the automobile. A couple of excerpts: “What about getting more mileage out of the fuel itself? Nano-lubricants can reduce friction, converting engine power to motion instead of heat. In fact, some predict that nanocoatings [...]

Nanotech: a view from Indonesia

Posted by Christine Peterson on March 1st, 2006

Writing in The Jakarta Post, Indonesia’s leading English language newspaper, is attorney Mohamad Mova Al ‘Afghan. He looks specifically at molecular nanotechnology, which he defines as “the capability to assemble any product than can be designed directly from atoms and molecules.” See the full article, or these excerpts: “The revolution in manufacturing resulting from MNT [...]

Africans respond to prospect of nanotech competition

Posted by Christine Peterson on January 10th, 2006

In a piece titled When Technology Displaces the Farmer, Arnold Munthali presents the ETC Group’s concerns about nanotech-based competition for African farmers, and responses from the farmers’ representatives attending the World Trade Organization meeting in Hong Kong: “While delegates are negotiating for better trade, however, Jim Thomas of the ETC Group, which campaigns on ecological [...]

Be a nanoanalyst & get paid for it

Posted by Christine Peterson on November 15th, 2005

It’s not as fun as my job here at Foresight — what could be? — but Lux Research is recruiting Analyst and Senior Analyst positions based in NYC, SF, or Boston. Required for both: “Deep intellectual curiosity about emerging technologies…Fluency in spoken and written Mandarin or Korean is a huge plus; Western European or Middle [...]

Nanotechnology in the developing world

Posted by Christine Peterson on July 25th, 2005

Foresight Research Associate Bryan Bruns reports: “Will heavy investments in nanotechnology lead to a North-South nanodivide? In the Policy Forum of the July 1 issue of Science, an article, Small Things and Big Changes in the Developing World, argues that the answer appears to be no. Mohammed H.A. Hassan of the Academy of Sciences for [...]

Let’s put nanotechnology in larger chemical context

Posted by Christine Peterson on July 19th, 2005

Recently there have been a spate of media articles triggered by a July 13 report from the U.S. Government Accountability Office to the effect that, as an LA Times piece put it: “The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency is failing to protect the public from tens of thousands of toxic compounds because it has not gathered [...]

Nanotechnology projections

Posted by RobertBradbury on March 28th, 2005

The Prime Minister's council working party predicts (registration required) that in 10 years, nanotechnology could have as much impact as the discovery of electricity or the development of the computer microchip.

Nanotechnology and the Poor

Posted by RobertBradbury on February 7th, 2005

The Meridian Institute has released a paper "Nanotech & the Poor: Opportunities and Risks". The purpose of the paper to raise awareness about the implications of nanotechnology for poor people, both the potential opportunities and risks.

The top level entry page is here. Registration appears to be required although email exchanges may be possible as well. You can download a copy of the paper after registration but subsequent access, in particular making comments, appears to require the username and password sent via email.

They are seeking Nanodot users and Foresight members' views on the issues identified in the Paper via an on-line consultation. Comments are due by March 1.

New Study: Nanotechnology Poised to Revolutionize

Posted by RobertBradbury on October 30th, 2004

Gina Miller writes "New Study: Nanotechnology Poised to Revolutionize Tech, Manufacturing Markets; Market Will Rival Sales Volume of Combined Tech and Telecom Markets. Sales of products incorporating nanotechnology will total $2.6 trillion in 10 years, approximately one-fifth of the current Gross Domestic Product, greatly exceeding previous estimates, according to a new report released by a leading Wall Street financial analyst. Nano- enhanced products will account for 50 percent of all electronics and information technology products and 16 percent of all healthcare products by 2014, according to the report. This story was found at U.S. Newswire 10/29/04."

Ed. Note… Maybe its slowly sinking into the minds of those who are supposed to be predicting the future how disruptive nanotech is likely to be….

Sen. Kerry Pitches 30 billion for Tech Investment

Posted by Jim Lewis on July 2nd, 2004

Gina Miller writes "Last week Sen. John Kerry spoke at San Jose State University where he discussed his agenda if he were elected President. Within his proposal was a suggested 30 billion dollars towards hi-tech jobs and funding increases to foster research and science in many areas, including nanotechnology. Read the article at EETimes."

Cars To Be Assembled with Atomic Precision

Posted by Jim Lewis on June 23rd, 2004

Roland Piquepaille writes "In this article, the Detroit News says that the adoption of nanotechnology by car manufacturers will produce safer, lighter and cheaper vehicles. While GM is already using nanocomposite materials for several vans, Ford is developing new nanoengineered catalysts to replace platinum. The newspaper gives other examples, such as auto-adaptive suspension systems, scratch-resistant paints or nanocoated windshields which will not crack. In fact, all parts in a car can be improved by using nanotechnology, according to the article. And if automakers are only going to introduce limited amounts of nanotechnology-related products in the next few years, their usage should be widespread within ten years. More details are available in this overview."

NanoBusiness Alliance more favorable to MNT?

Posted by Christine Peterson on May 27th, 2004

Steve Clark writes "Foresight director Glenn Reynolds has previously written several pessimistic articles on the Nanobusiness Alliance's views on molecular manufacturing. His latest article points toward a refreshing change: "It looks to me as if the industry has avoided a serious mistake, and that it has done so before its earlier approach led to disaster." Included is a quote from Smalltimes: "Modzelewski, normally an outspoken Drexler critic, was unusually courtly toward the group. 'Foresight has created some frameworks and guidelines for going forward that people should be looking at,' he said." Here's the complete article."

Zyvex joins Working In Nanotechnology as Gold Partner

Posted by Jim Lewis on April 19th, 2004

Richardson, Texas (April 2, 2004) – Zyvex Corporation, the first molecular nanotechnology company, signed up as a Gold Partner to Workingin-nanotechnology.com, the newly established global nanotechnology job, recruitment, and education site.

Fabrication cost key to implementing nanotechnology

Posted by Jim Lewis on February 28th, 2004

Nanotechnology: Replicating the Snowflake in the Fab, an article by Jeff Chappell in the Electronic News, reports the remarks of Thomas Theis, director of physical sciences for IBM research, in a keynote address at the SPIE Microlithography Conference, that containing the cost of fabrication may be the key to implementing nanotechnology in the information technology business.

MIT’s Nanoruler Could Impact Chip Manufacturing

Posted by Jim Lewis on February 28th, 2004

Roland Piquepaille writes "Researchers from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) have devised the world?s most precise ruler, able to draw parallel lines separated by only a few hundred nanometers with a precision of under a nanometer. This has the potential to have a great influence on fields such as computer chips manufacturing as well as space physics. And, as says the MIT, this is a promising line of work. "The Nanoruler is 10 to 1,000 times faster and more precise than other methods for patterning parallel lines and spaces (known collectively as gratings) across large surfaces more than 12 inches in diameter. Such large surfaces are key to a number of applications involving gratings, such as larger wafers for the production of computer chips and higher-resolution space telescopes." This summary contains more details and references."

Mapping location of nanotechnology companies

Posted by Jim Lewis on February 19th, 2004

Bmelki writes "Nanovip.com has established comparative statistics from the number of nanotechnology companies that we have in our database. The companies were sorted by country and American state, then put into graphics. At this stage, America is the leading country by far; California being the leading state with the most nanotechnology involved companies."