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Archive for the 'Molecular Electronics' Category

Advanced technologies by design

Posted by Stephanie C on December 16th, 2013

Design and prediction are integral to Atomically Precise Manufacturing and its development. This is in part because fully functional APM can be readily explored computationally today, to levels of precision that cannot be experimentally developed today. In such a context, design is not just a resource but an approach. With rapidly expanding computational power, examples [...]

Carbyne: the strongest, stiffest carbon chain

Posted by Stephanie C on October 11th, 2013

Carbyne – a straight line of carbon atoms linked by double bonds or by alternating single and triple bonds — is the next stiff, carbon-based structure with unusual and desirable properties. It has been observed under limited natural and experimental conditions, is expected to be difficult to synthesize and store, and now has been theoretically [...]

Conference video: Assembly and Manipulation of Molecules at the Atomic Scale

Posted by Jim Lewis on August 29th, 2013

At the 2013 Conference the winner of the 2011 Feynman Prize for Experimental work presents STM studies showing how the manipulation of single molecules on a surface can yield insights to their mechanical, electronic, and optical properties, and be used in a controlled way to build pre-defined molecular architectures.

Next Foresight Conference on Nanotechnology in February 2014

Posted by Jim Lewis on August 28th, 2013

The Conference to be held February 7-9, 2014 in Palo Alto, California will emphasize the integration of nano-engineered devices and materials into larger, more complex systems.

Quantum dot conduction impacted by stoichiometry, not dangling bonds

Posted by Stephanie C on May 29th, 2013

Quantum dots are semiconducting, nanoscale clusters that show electronic characteristics distinct from both bulk-scale materials and single molecules. Their special characteristics make quantum dots attractive for a broad range of potential applications, including photovoltaics and nanoscale transistors. The size and shape of quantum dots impact electrical properties and can therefore be used to tune the [...]

Germanane: germanium's answer to graphane

Posted by Stephanie C on May 15th, 2013

Soon after graphene sheets were being produced on a laboratory scale routinely, researchers began producing the hydrogenated version graphane (with a hydrogen atom on each carbon). This step is one of many approaches aimed at harnessing graphene’s powerful conductivity and is also being explored for hydrogen storage and other potential applications (more info in this [...]

Silicene: silicon's answer to graphene

Posted by Stephanie C on May 1st, 2013

On the list of potential post-silicon materials for electronics and chips is none other than silicon. More specifically, silicene — 2D sheets of hexagonally arranged silicon atoms, structurally analogous to graphene and experimentally characterized by physicist Guy Le Lay of Aix-Marseille University in France (2012 abstract here). While graphene possesses exceptional performance qualities, it can’t [...]

Superparamagnetism-explicated-for us

Posted by Stephanie C on April 17th, 2013

Even though the sound of it is something quite atrocious, superparamagnetism may become a familiar term in the context of nanoscale electronics and devices. Loosely speaking, superparamagnetism is a size-based phenomenon in which materials that are ferromagnetic on the macroscale — meaning predisposed toward strong magnetization at room temperature, such as iron and nickel — [...]

Controlled stepwise rotation on a single atom bearing

Posted by Jim Lewis on January 21st, 2013

Electrons from a scanning tunneling microscope tip turn a five-arm rotor connected via a single ruthenium atom bearing to a tripod anchoring the molecular motor to a gold surface.

New Darpa program may accelerate synthetic biology path to advanced nanotechnology

Posted by Jim Lewis on May 26th, 2012

Darpa has launched a “Living Foundries” program to bring an engineering perspective to synthetic biology to greatly accelerate progress through standardization and modularization.

Mounting graphene on boron nitride improves its electronic properties

Posted by Jim Lewis on April 21st, 2012

Creating a superlattice by placing graphene on boron nitride may allow control of electron motion in graphene and make graphene electronics practical.

Nanotechnology, DNA sequencing, and personalized medicine

Posted by Jim Lewis on February 20th, 2012

Artist’s conception of a nanopore drilled into a layer of graphene to speed up DNA sequencing. One of the greatest promises of near-term nanotechnoloogy is cheaper DNA sequencing to speed the development of personalized medicine. There are not only genetic differences between different patients, but also genetic differences between, for example, different cancers of the [...]

Atomically-precise positioning of a single atom transistor-VIDEO

Posted by Jim Lewis on February 19th, 2012

Researchers in Australia and the US have demonstrated a working transistor by placing of single atom of phosphorous with atomic precision between gates made of wires only a few phosphorous atoms wide. This demonstration points to possibly extending current computer technology to the atomic scale.

Graphene heterostructures may lead to graphene-based computer chips

Posted by Jim Lewis on February 12th, 2012

A field-effect tunneling transistor comprising a vertical heterostructure of atomically thin layers of graphene and boron nitride or molybdenum disulfide may pave the way for computer chips based on graphene nanotechnology.

Magnetic storage systems shrink from a million atoms per bit to twelve

Posted by Jim Lewis on January 13th, 2012

An array of 96 iron atoms on a copper nitride surface, assembled using an STM and used to write a byte, demonstrates how small magnetic storage could shrink and may lead to novel nanomaterials for quantum computers.

A molecular switch with a single proton switched by a single electron

Posted by Jim Lewis on December 19th, 2011

How small could a molecular switch be made? It is difficult to think of one smaller than the single proton switch just demonstrated by this group in Germany.

Foresight@Google: Full Program of Speakers posted!

Posted by Christine Peterson on June 2nd, 2011

We are proud to announce our final conference program for Foresight@Google‘s 25th Anniversary Conference Celebration, held June 25-26 in Mountain View, CA.  For $50 off registration use code: NANODOT This weekend – full of plenary talks, panels, and breakout sessions – is a unique opportunity to be stimulated, enlightened and inspired by direct interaction with [...]

A modular molecular composite nanosystem for solar power

Posted by Jim Lewis on May 17th, 2011

A bacterial virus called M13 was genetically engineered to control the arrangement of carbon nanotubes, improving solar-cell efficiency by nearly one-third.

Promise and challenge on the road to practical graphene electronics

Posted by Jim Lewis on April 29th, 2011

Smaller, faster, cooler: graphene transistors show promise for practical analog signal processors, for magnetic memory devices, and for self-cooling electronic circuits.

Controlling the orientation and stretching of DNA attached to a surface

Posted by Jim Lewis on March 15th, 2011

A shear flow processing method has been developed to control the surface attachment and orientation of DNA molecules to use for DNA-organic semiconductor molecular building blocks.