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Archive for the 'Research' Category

Generating hydrogen with single atom catalysts

Posted by Jim Lewis on November 13th, 2015

Single cobalt atoms have been positioned in nitrogen-doped graphene to catalytically produce hydrogen from water almost as effectively as using vastly more expensive platinum catalysts.

Architecture for atomically precise quantum computer in silicon

Posted by Jim Lewis on November 9th, 2015

Building on previous work on single atom transistors and single atom qubits, Australian researchers have incorporated a quantum error correction code to make possible a scalable 3D silicon chip architecture that could lead to operational quantum computers.

One-directional rotation in a new artificial molecular motor

Posted by Jim Lewis on November 5th, 2015

Independent rotation of two wheels attached to either end of an axle has been achieved in a light-driven artificial molecular motor, suggesting a basis for a nanometer-scale transport system.

DNA nanomachine lights up to diagnose diseases

Posted by Jim Lewis on November 2nd, 2015

DNA nanotechnology produces an artificial molecular machine that changes shape when it encounters a specific antibody or other protein molecule, and emits light to signal the target’s presence.

Chirality-assisted synthesis a new tool for nanotechnology

Posted by Jim Lewis on October 30th, 2015

A novel application of supramolecular chemistry allows molecules to join in only one direction, providing a new way to control the shape of large molecules.

Surface assisted self-assembly of DNA origami nanostructures

Posted by Jim Lewis on October 26th, 2015

A lipid bilayer supported by a mica surface assisted the mobile self-assembly of DNA nanostructures of various shapes into micrometer-scale 2D lattices.

Conference video: New Methods of Exploring, Analyzing, and Predicting Molecular Interactions

Posted by Jim Lewis on October 8th, 2015

Prof. Art Olson discussed how we understand what we cannot see directly, how we integrate data from different sources, and how to develop software tools to move forward.

Nanotechnology carries gene editing package into cells

Posted by Jim Lewis on October 2nd, 2015

Hijacking a viral method of replicating circular genomes, ball-of-yarn-like DNA clews are used to transport the protein and guide RNA molecules needed for gene editing into the cell nucleus.

DNA nanotechnology guides assembling cells into 'Organoids'

Posted by Jim Lewis on September 30th, 2015

DNA strands decorating cell membranes like ‘Velcro’ program the adhesion of cells to other cells or to extracellular matrices to build tiny tissue models.

Catalytic micromotors demonstrate carbon dioxide removal from water

Posted by Jim Lewis on September 29th, 2015

A micromotor covered with the enzyme carbonic anhydrase zips through water rapidly converting dissolved carbon dioxide to the bicarbonate ion, which can then be precipitated as calcium carbonate.

Atomically precise boron doping of graphene nanoribbons

Posted by Jim Lewis on September 28th, 2015

The ability to dope graphene nanoribbons with boron atoms to atomic precision opens a range of possible new applications, from chemical sensing to nanoelectronics to photocatalysis to battery electrodes.

Parallel to protein folding improves DNA origami process

Posted by Jim Lewis on September 27th, 2015

Designing a small DNA origami that can fold in several almost equivalent ways demonstrates how understanding and guiding the folding pathway can improve the efficiency of the folding process, potentially leading in more complex situations to higher yields of the desired nanostructure and fewer misfolded structures.

Addressable molecular machines arranged in a porous crystal

Posted by Jim Lewis on September 10th, 2015

Simple molecular switches based upon bistable mechanically interlocked molecules can be incorporated within pre-assembled metal organic frameworks and addressed electrochemically.

Nanotechnology provides sensors for liver-on-chip drug testing

Posted by Jim Lewis on September 2nd, 2015

Adding nanotechnology-based optoelectronic sensors to human cells cultured on a chip keeps the cells healthy long enough to replace animal testing with a human liver-on-a-chip.

Macroscopic mechanical manipulation controls molecular machine array

Posted by Jim Lewis on September 1st, 2015

A pliers-shaped molecule in which two covalently linked naphthalene moieties serve as the hinge connecting the two halves of the pliers, and each naphthalene connects the hydrophobic handle with the hydrophilic jaw of that half, opens and closes in response to surprisingly little energy applied to a molecular monolayer.

Femtosecond imaging with near nanometer spatial resolution

Posted by Jim Lewis on August 31st, 2015

Analysis of multiple diffraction images provides high contrast, high quality, full field 3D imaging of surfaces illuminated by extreme ultraviolet photons from a tabletop laser.

A tunable bandgap by doping a few atomic layers of black phosphorous

Posted by Jim Lewis on August 29th, 2015

A vertical electrical field from dopant atoms of potassium added to the surface of a few stacked layers of phosphorene tunes the band gap of black phosphorous, possibly leading to novel electronic and optoelectronic devices.

Novel wireframe nanostructures from new DNA origami design process

Posted by Jim Lewis on August 18th, 2015

A new set of design rules enables constructing any wireframe nanostructure, which may lead to new medical applications and new nanomachines.

Conference video: Artificial Biochemistry with DNA

Posted by Jim Lewis on August 13th, 2015

Modeling DNA strand displacement cascades according to three simple rules can in principle mimic the temporal dynamics of any other chemical system, presenting a method to model regulatory networks even more complicated than those of biology.

Another nanotechnology computer memory breakthrough from Feynman Prize winner

Posted by Jim Lewis on August 12th, 2015

A novel nanostructured material based on tantalum oxide could make possible non-volatile crossbar array memories that store up to 162 gigabits in 3-D memory stacks.