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Archive for the 'Research' Category

New scaffold for nanotechnology engineered from amyloid-like proteins

Posted by Jim Lewis on April 4th, 2015

Design and computational simulation of amyloid proteins of diverse functions from diverse sources enable the self-assembly of proteins that could provide scaffolds for diverse applications.

Cotranscriptional folding of single RNA strand added to nanotechnology toolkit

Posted by Jim Lewis on March 31st, 2015

RNA origami brings new dimensions to nucleic acid nanotechnology by exploiting the much greater variety of RNA structural motifs (compared to DNA) to do what cannot easily be done with DNA origami, like fold into predetermined nanostructures rapidly while being transcribed.

Automated synthesis expands nanotechnology building block repertoire

Posted by Jim Lewis on March 24th, 2015

Iterative coupling, purification, and cyclization of a large collection of organic building blocks promises a vast array of complex small and medium sized molecules as candidates for drug discovery, catalysis, and nanotechnology.

Targeted nanoparticles deliver molecules to resolve atherosclerotic inflammation

Posted by Jim Lewis on March 9th, 2015

In tests in a mouse model of advanced atherosclerosis, core-shell nanoparticles, composed of block copolymers and targeted to sites of inflammation and vascular injury, delivered a bioactive peptide that improved key properties of advanced plaques.

Atomically precise manufacturing as the future of nanotechnology

Posted by Jim Lewis on March 8th, 2015

A commentary over at Gizmodo argues that ideas about molecular manufacturing that sounded like science fiction in 1986 now sound more like science fact.

Small, fast, electrically-driven nanomotors

Posted by Jim Lewis on March 5th, 2015

Bulk nanoscale technologies were used to create three-segment nanowires of gold and nickel, and magnetic bearings of gold, nickel, and chromium. Combinations of DC and AC electric fields were used to assemble nanomotors that can spin at speeds up to 18,000r.p.m., and for up to 15 hours.

Designing mechanical functions into DNA nanotechnology

Posted by Jim Lewis on March 3rd, 2015

An overview of three decades of progress in DNA nanotechnology emphasizes bringing programmed motion to DNA nanostructures, including efforts to incorporate design principles from macroscopic mechanical engineering.

Mixing two types of nanoparticle triggers structure change

Posted by Jim Lewis on February 5th, 2015

Mixing two different types of cylindrical nanoparticles causes them to reorganize into smaller spherical nanoparticles. A mechanism to release drugs only inside cells that internalize both types?

Penta-graphene a new form of carbon for chemistry and nanotechnology

Posted by Jim Lewis on February 4th, 2015

Computational simulations demonstrate that pentagonal tiling to give a variant of graphene based on pentagons rather than on hexagons is dynamically, thermally, and mechanically stable.

Adding layer to a piezoelectric nanostructure increases output voltage

Posted by Jim Lewis on February 3rd, 2015

Applications of nanotechnology to wearable electronics and other portable devices will benefit from the discovery that adding an insulating layer to a piezoelectric nanostructure increases the output voltage by up to 200 times.

Simple nanotechnology modification of alumina surface discourages bacteria

Posted by Jim Lewis on February 2nd, 2015

A simple method of producing nanoporous alumina surface discourages bacteria from attaching and forming biofilms, with potential applications in medicine, dentistry, and food processing.

A tunable hinge joint for DNA nanotechnology

Posted by Jim Lewis on January 31st, 2015

Variable length single-stranded DNA springs determine how far a hinge of double-stranded DNA joining two stiff sections of DNA origami can bend.

Structural DNA nanotechnology with programmed motions

Posted by Jim Lewis on January 28th, 2015

Scaffolded DNA origami is combined with hinges of single- or double-stranded DNA to built simple machines parts that have been combined to program simple to complex motions.

Piezoelectric monolayer joins toolkit for nanomanipulation

Posted by Jim Lewis on January 8th, 2015

To measure in-plane piezoelectric stress, an MoS2 film was suspended on HSQ posts and clamped by two Au electrodes. When the film was indented with a scanning AFM probe, the induced stress changed the load on the cantilever, which was observed by the deflection of a laser beam. Credit: Berkeley Lab

Swarms of DNA nanorobots execute complex tasks in living animal

Posted by Jim Lewis on January 6th, 2015

Combinations of different types of DNA nanorobots, implementing different logic gates, work together to tag a specific type of cell in a living cockroach depending on the presence or absence of two protein signals.

New software reveals more molecular machine structures

Posted by Jim Lewis on December 31st, 2014

New software makes it possible to generate 3D structures of proteins without artificially incorporating metal atoms in the proteins, making it possible to study many molecular machines using data that could not previously be analyzed.

Small molecule nanorobot walks through a protein nanopore

Posted by Jim Lewis on December 30th, 2014

Among the smallest molecular robots reported so far, a walker based on phenylarsonous acid with two organic thiol ligands as feet walks through a one-nanometer-diameter protein nanopore channel by taking 0.6 nanometer steps, by thiol exchange, from one cysteine residue to the next.

Computational framework for structural DNA nanotechnology

Posted by Jim Lewis on December 27th, 2014

A more general computational framework predicts the structures of 2D and 3D-curved DNA nanostructures impossible to predict using previously available computational methods. May lead to 3D-printing DNA nanostructures?

New way to couple carbon atoms yields novel molecular architectures

Posted by Jim Lewis on December 24th, 2014

A new strategy to form bonds between carbon atoms opens the way to a wide variety of molecular architectures that had been difficult or impossible to access using previous methods.

Artificial enzymes created from building blocks not found in nature

Posted by Jim Lewis on December 22nd, 2014

Artificial enzymes have been created from nucleic acids that use synthetic molecules instead of ribose or deoxyribose sugars.