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Archive for the 'Found On Web' Category

Macroscopic DNA crystals from molecular tensegrity triangles

Posted by Jim Lewis on May 2nd, 2016

Structural DNA nanotechnology: progress toward a precise self-assembling three dimensional scaffold by building macroscopic crystals from nanoscale structures.

Nanotechnologies to advance solar energy utilization

Posted by Jim Lewis on March 25th, 2016

Increasing efficiency and utilization and lowering costs for harvesting, converting, transporting, and storing energy produced from sunlight provides a showcase for a variety of nanoscale materials, structures, and processes.

Caltech celebrates ten years of Scaffolded DNA Origami

Posted by Jim Lewis on March 14th, 2016

California Institute of Technology is holding a symposium to honor Paul Rothemund’s seminal contribution to the field of DNA nanotechnology: the research paths opened by the technology, and where they might lead.

Roles of materials research and polymer chemistry in developing nanotechnology

Posted by Jim Lewis on February 16th, 2016

Polymer chemistry and materials research provide opportunities to explore structures that harmonize phenomena unique to nanoscale technology, the role of mechanical forces generated at interfaces, and the responses of biological systems to mechanical stresses.

Science and technology roadmaps for nanotechnology

Posted by Jim Lewis on May 3rd, 2015

A European Science and Technology Roadmap for Graphene, Related Two-Dimensional Crystals, and Hybrid Systems hints at the opportunities to be harvested from, and the need for, the development of atomically precise manufacturing (APM).

UK SuperSTEM facility advances imaging and analysis of materials

Posted by Jim Lewis on April 30th, 2015

Advanced aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopes in UK facility provide atomically precise characterization of a variety of materials to guide R&D in alloys, drug delivery, lasers and other areas.

Atomically precise manufacturing as the future of nanotechnology

Posted by Jim Lewis on March 8th, 2015

A commentary over at Gizmodo argues that ideas about molecular manufacturing that sounded like science fiction in 1986 now sound more like science fact.

Are nanorobots and atomically precise manufacturing becoming mainstream nanotechnology?

Posted by Jim Lewis on March 7th, 2015

The idea that nanorobots fabricated by atomically precise manufacturing processes are a likely part of our future, and that this is a good thing, is appearing more frequently, largely as a result of Drexler’s recent book Radical Abundance.

Notes for 400 hours of Richard Feynman's Hughes Lectures

Posted by Jim Lewis on November 12th, 2014

While a consultant for Hughes Aircraft Company from 1966 through 1971, Richard Feynman delivered about two hundred lectures that were available only to Hughes employees. Unfortunately these lectures were never recorded. An attendee has now released 1000 pages of notes he took and transcribed from these lectures.

Recent cases of 'accessible' high-tech: Open source chips & Origami robots

Posted by Stephanie C on August 22nd, 2014

Nanotech promises more commonplace access to advanced technology as material and fabrication costs fall and traditional barriers to innovation are removed. Examples are already being seen globally: more access to laptops and cell phones in developing countries, desktop 3D printers, a surge in establishment of shared-use research facilities, etc. A couple recent cases getting attention [...]

Biology is capable of evolving functional mechanical gears

Posted by Jim Lewis on October 16th, 2013

Nymphs of certain jumping insects have evolved 400-micrometer mechanical gear strips to precisely synchronize legs when jumping.

THE SINGULARITY film premiere at The Castro Theatre 09.16.13

Posted by Jim Lewis on September 6th, 2013

Doug Wolens’s documentary “THE SINGULARITY: Will we survive our technology” premieres at San Francisco’s Castro Theatre September 16, 2013.

Proposed Brain Activity Map may also advance nanotechnology

Posted by Jim Lewis on March 1st, 2013

A proposed large project to produce a dynamic map of the functional connectome of the human brain will require a convergence of neuroscience, biotechnology, nanotechnology, and computation, and may therefore spur the development of advanced nanotechnology leading to molecular manufacturing.

Feynman 1984 talk on Tiny Machines on You Tube

Posted by Jim Lewis on August 27th, 2012

The conceptual history of nanotechnology is usually traced to a classic talk “There’s Plenty of Room at the Bottom” that Richard Feynman gave on December 29th 1959 at the annual meeting of the American Physical Society at the California Institute of Technology (Caltech), which was first published in Caltech Engineering and Science, Volume 23:5, February [...]

NANOYOU video introduces nanotechnology to students and others

Posted by Jim Lewis on July 23rd, 2012

A European Commission-funded video and education portal introduces nanotechnology to students and others.

Nanotechnology, digital fabrication, and innovation at TED

Posted by Jim Lewis on March 2nd, 2012

A talk at TEDxBerkeley includes nanotechnology among the options for digital fabrication, one of five new rules of innovation.

Current nanotechnology too cool to ignore

Posted by Jim Lewis on February 10th, 2012

ideo of a superhydrophobic spray-on coating shows chocolate syrup shooting off a white shoe leaving it spotless.

Crowd-sourced protein design a promising path to advanced nanotechnology

Posted by Jim Lewis on January 24th, 2012

Foldit game players have again out-performed scientists in protein design, this time improving the design of a protein designed from scratch to catalyze Diels-Alder cycloadditions.

Advanced nanofactories in twenty years?

Posted by Jim Lewis on January 12th, 2012

An article in The Guardian quotes Christine Peterson and Robert Freitas on the vision of molecular manufacturing. Freitas is quoted as expecting that the development of nanofactories could be done in 20 years for “on the order of” one billion dollars.

Molecular information theory points to robust molecular communications

Posted by Jim Lewis on August 4th, 2011

Those interested in issues of communication at the nanoscale will be interested to learn that the first volume of the new journal Nano Communication Networks, from Elsevier, edited by Ian Akyildiz, is available free of charge. The volume comprises four issues dated March through December of 2010. Just to pick one article out of dozens [...]