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Archive for the 'Bionanotechnology' Category

New scaffold for nanotechnology engineered from amyloid-like proteins

Posted by Jim Lewis on April 4th, 2015

Design and computational simulation of amyloid proteins of diverse functions from diverse sources enable the self-assembly of proteins that could provide scaffolds for diverse applications.

Cotranscriptional folding of single RNA strand added to nanotechnology toolkit

Posted by Jim Lewis on March 31st, 2015

RNA origami brings new dimensions to nucleic acid nanotechnology by exploiting the much greater variety of RNA structural motifs (compared to DNA) to do what cannot easily be done with DNA origami, like fold into predetermined nanostructures rapidly while being transcribed.

Targeted nanoparticles deliver molecules to resolve atherosclerotic inflammation

Posted by Jim Lewis on March 9th, 2015

In tests in a mouse model of advanced atherosclerosis, core-shell nanoparticles, composed of block copolymers and targeted to sites of inflammation and vascular injury, delivered a bioactive peptide that improved key properties of advanced plaques.

Atomically precise manufacturing as the future of nanotechnology

Posted by Jim Lewis on March 8th, 2015

A commentary over at Gizmodo argues that ideas about molecular manufacturing that sounded like science fiction in 1986 now sound more like science fact.

Designing mechanical functions into DNA nanotechnology

Posted by Jim Lewis on March 3rd, 2015

An overview of three decades of progress in DNA nanotechnology emphasizes bringing programmed motion to DNA nanostructures, including efforts to incorporate design principles from macroscopic mechanical engineering.

A tunable hinge joint for DNA nanotechnology

Posted by Jim Lewis on January 31st, 2015

Variable length single-stranded DNA springs determine how far a hinge of double-stranded DNA joining two stiff sections of DNA origami can bend.

Structural DNA nanotechnology with programmed motions

Posted by Jim Lewis on January 28th, 2015

Scaffolded DNA origami is combined with hinges of single- or double-stranded DNA to built simple machines parts that have been combined to program simple to complex motions.

Swarms of DNA nanorobots execute complex tasks in living animal

Posted by Jim Lewis on January 6th, 2015

Combinations of different types of DNA nanorobots, implementing different logic gates, work together to tag a specific type of cell in a living cockroach depending on the presence or absence of two protein signals.

New software reveals more molecular machine structures

Posted by Jim Lewis on December 31st, 2014

New software makes it possible to generate 3D structures of proteins without artificially incorporating metal atoms in the proteins, making it possible to study many molecular machines using data that could not previously be analyzed.

Small molecule nanorobot walks through a protein nanopore

Posted by Jim Lewis on December 30th, 2014

Among the smallest molecular robots reported so far, a walker based on phenylarsonous acid with two organic thiol ligands as feet walks through a one-nanometer-diameter protein nanopore channel by taking 0.6 nanometer steps, by thiol exchange, from one cysteine residue to the next.

Computational framework for structural DNA nanotechnology

Posted by Jim Lewis on December 27th, 2014

A more general computational framework predicts the structures of 2D and 3D-curved DNA nanostructures impossible to predict using previously available computational methods. May lead to 3D-printing DNA nanostructures?

Artificial enzymes created from building blocks not found in nature

Posted by Jim Lewis on December 22nd, 2014

Artificial enzymes have been created from nucleic acids that use synthetic molecules instead of ribose or deoxyribose sugars.

Large, open protein cages designed and built

Posted by Jim Lewis on December 7th, 2014

Design principles have been developed and tested to construct novel synthetic protein monomers that can self-assemble into large, open protein cages for potential use in vaccines and drug delivery.

Broadening the synthetic biology path to molecular nanotechnology

Posted by Jim Lewis on December 6th, 2014

Advances in the de novo design of coiled-coil proteins made by two different research groups proceeding by two different routes demonstrate that the range of protein nanostructures potentially available for various molecular machine systems is significantly larger than the range of such structures already exploited by natural selection.

Micrometer-scale structures built from DNA bricks

Posted by Jim Lewis on November 19th, 2014

A general framework is presented for using 32-nucleotide DNA bricks to build large two-dimensional crystals up to 80 nm thick and incorporating sophisticated three-dimensional features.

Using DNA nanotechnology to cast arbitrarily shaped nanoparticles

Posted by Jim Lewis on November 11th, 2014

Metal or other inorganic nanoparticles of 20 to 30-nm scale can be cast in arbitrary 3D shapes and configurations dictated by stiff, atomically precise molds constructed using scaffold DNA origami.

DNA nanotechnology and the atoms to micrometer nanofabrication gap

Posted by Jim Lewis on September 26th, 2014

A new DARPA program seeks to bridge the gap from atoms to macroscale product manufacture in two steps, the first of which is from atoms to micrometer-scale feedstocks. DNA origami may be part of the solution.

Scaffolded DNA origami improvements advance DNA nanotechnology

Posted by Jim Lewis on September 25th, 2014

A 10-fold larger breadboard and 350-fold lower DNA synthesis costs make DNA origami a more useful stepping-stone toward atomically precise manufacturing.

Novel multifunctional nanoparticle for diagnosis and therapy

Posted by Jim Lewis on September 14th, 2014

A nanoparticle that self-assembles from porphyrin, cholic acid, amino acids, and polyethylene glycol is a promising vehicle for delivering both imaging agents and cancer drugs to tumors.

Proof of principle for nanoscale assembly line

Posted by Jim Lewis on September 2nd, 2014

Swiss researchers have used biomolecular shuttles to capture molecular building blocks from solution and transport them across fluid flow boundaries to be further manipulated in a subsequent chamber.