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Archive for the 'Productive Nanosystems' Category

From de novo protein design to molecular machine systems

Posted by Jim Lewis on January 30th, 2017

A review from the group leading recent rapid progress in de novo protein design describes the successes, identifies the remaining challenges, and heralds the advance “from the Stone Age to the Iron Age” in protein design.

Two-component, 120-subunit icosahedral cage extends protein nanotechnology

Posted by Jim Lewis on January 28th, 2017

Ten designs spanning three types of icosahedral architectures produce atomically precise multi-megadalton protein cages to deliver biological cargo or serve as scaffolds for organizing various molecular functions.

New Funding Opportunity from U.S. DOE

Posted by Jim Lewis on January 1st, 2017

A new funding opportunity from the Advanced Manufacturing Office, U.S. Department of Energy, incudes a subtopic on Atomically Precise Manufacturing

DOE office focusing on atomically precise manufacturing

Posted by Jim Lewis on December 31st, 2016

Longtime Foresight member Dave Forrest is leading DOE’s Advanced Manufacturing Office in advocating atomically precise manufacturing to transform the U.S. manufacturing base.

Nobel Prize in Chemistry recognizes molecular machines

Posted by Jim Lewis on October 10th, 2016

Sir J. Fraser Stoddart, winner of 2007 Foresight Feynman Prize for Experiment, shares the 2016 Chemistry Nobel for the design and synthesis of molecular machines.

Watching individual chemical bonds during a reaction

Posted by Jim Lewis on August 2nd, 2016

Combining computational nanotechnology with a noncontact-atomic force microscope probe tipped by a single CO molecule allowed researchers to visualize the dance of individual chemical bonds during a complex organic reaction on a silver surface.

Protein design provides a novel metabolic path for carbon fixation

Posted by Jim Lewis on June 8th, 2016

Computational design of an enzyme that carboligates three one-carbon molecules to form one three-carbon molecule, an activity that does not exist in nature, provides proof-of-principle for a novel metabolic pathway for carbon fixation.

Triple helices stabilize macroscopic crystals for DNA nanotechnology

Posted by Jim Lewis on May 5th, 2016

A DNA strand capable of forming a triple helix with a portion of the DNA double helices in a macroscopic DNA crystal enhances the weak interactions holding the crystal together so that the crystal remains stable in the absence of a high ionic strength environment.

Five ionized atoms provide scalable implementation of quantum computation algorithm

Posted by Jim Lewis on April 3rd, 2016

Five calcium ions held several micrometers apart in an ion trap and manipulated by laser pulses implement Shor’s factorization algorithm more efficiently than previous implementations.

Tightly-fitted DNA parts form dynamic nanomachine

Posted by Jim Lewis on March 10th, 2016

A rotor with DNA origami parts held together by an engineered tight fit instead of by covalent bonds can revolve freely, driven by Brownian motion and dwelling at engineered docking sites.

Multiple advances in de novo protein design and prediction

Posted by Jim Lewis on February 14th, 2016

New families of protein structures, barrel proteins for positioning small molecules, self-assembling protein arrays, and precision sculpting of protein architectures highlight de novo protein design advances.

Rational design of protein architectures not found in nature

Posted by Jim Lewis on February 11th, 2016

Computational design of proteins satisfying predetermined geometric constraints produced stable proteins with the designed structure that are not found in nature.

De novo protein design space extends far beyond biology

Posted by Jim Lewis on February 3rd, 2016

A fully automated design protocol generates dozens of designs for proteins based on helix-loop-helix-loop repeat units that are very stable, have crystal structures that match the design, have very different overall shapes, and are unrelated to any natural protein.

Atomically precise boron doping of graphene nanoribbons

Posted by Jim Lewis on September 28th, 2015

The ability to dope graphene nanoribbons with boron atoms to atomic precision opens a range of possible new applications, from chemical sensing to nanoelectronics to photocatalysis to battery electrodes.

Automated design of polyhedral meshes for DNA origami

Posted by Jim Lewis on August 7th, 2015

An automated design process folds arbitrary meshes to produce DNA origami structures difficult to design by previous methods, including more open structures that are stable in ionic conditions used in biological assays.

Arranging molecular chromophores on DNA brick nanobreadboards

Posted by Jim Lewis on August 6th, 2015

Nanobreadboards made of DNA bricks provide twice the positional precision, twice the packing density, and faster prototyping than do alternative means to arrange functional molecules.

Wafer-scale atomically precise thin layers for nanotechnology

Posted by Jim Lewis on June 30th, 2015

By precise control of several factors, uniform high-performance monolayers of the semiconductor MoS2 have been obtained and used to fabricate field-effect transistors.

Google Tech Talk video by Feynman Prize Winner

Posted by Jim Lewis on June 24th, 2015

Designing and building spiroligomers, robust building blocks of various 3D shapes made from unnatural amino acids, decorated with various functional groups, and linked rigidly together by pairs of bonds, and a new approach to nanotechnology design software.

US OSTP seeking suggestions for Nanotechnology Grand Challenges

Posted by Jim Lewis on June 23rd, 2015

A US government Request for Information (RFI) is seeking suggestions for Nanotechnology-Inspired Grand Challenges for the Next Decade. The manufacture of atomically-precise materials is offered as #4 of 6 examples.

Preserving protein function in DNA-protein nanostructures

Posted by Jim Lewis on June 1st, 2015

Linking proteins to DNA scaffolds to produce complex functional nanostructures can require chemistry that damages protein function. A new systematic approach avoids exposing proteins to damaging conditions.