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Archive for the 'Productive Nanosystems' Category

Advancing nanotechnology with protein building blocks

Posted by Jim Lewis on June 6th, 2012

A variety of protein cage structures have been constructed by designing specific protein domains to self-assemble as atomically precise protein building blocks in defined geometries.

DNA tiles provide faster, less expensive way to fabricate complex DNA objects

Posted by Jim Lewis on May 31st, 2012

A set of 310 short single-stranded DNA tiles, plus a few additional short sequences for the edges, has been used to form more than a hundred large, complex DNA objects.

New Darpa program may accelerate synthetic biology path to advanced nanotechnology

Posted by Jim Lewis on May 26th, 2012

Darpa has launched a “Living Foundries” program to bring an engineering perspective to synthetic biology to greatly accelerate progress through standardization and modularization.

Adding to the toolbox for making complex molecular machines

Posted by Jim Lewis on April 4th, 2012

A set of rationally engineered transcriptional regulators for yeast will make it easier to build complex molecular machine systems in yeast, some of which may become useful additions to pathway technologies for atomically precise manufacturing and productive nanosystems.

DNA nanotechnology-based nanorobot delivers cell suicide message to cancer cells

Posted by Jim Lewis on March 8th, 2012

Functioning DNA nanorobots to deliver specific molecular signals to cells were designed by combining DNA origami, DNA aptamers, and DNA logic gates.

Machine learning may improve molecular design for nanotechnology

Posted by Jim Lewis on February 22nd, 2012

A set of machine learning programs can now predict properties of small organic molecules as accurately as can calculations based upon the Schrödinger equation, but in milliseconds rather than hours.

Atomically-precise positioning of a single atom transistor-VIDEO

Posted by Jim Lewis on February 19th, 2012

Researchers in Australia and the US have demonstrated a working transistor by placing of single atom of phosphorous with atomic precision between gates made of wires only a few phosphorous atoms wide. This demonstration points to possibly extending current computer technology to the atomic scale.

DNA motor navigates network of DNA tracks

Posted by Jim Lewis on January 31st, 2012

Scientists at Kyoto University and the University of Oxford have combined DNA origami and DNA motors to take another step toward programmed artificial molecular assembly lines.

Crowd-sourced protein design a promising path to advanced nanotechnology

Posted by Jim Lewis on January 24th, 2012

Foldit game players have again out-performed scientists in protein design, this time improving the design of a protein designed from scratch to catalyze Diels-Alder cycloadditions.

Advanced nanofactories in twenty years?

Posted by Jim Lewis on January 12th, 2012

An article in The Guardian quotes Christine Peterson and Robert Freitas on the vision of molecular manufacturing. Freitas is quoted as expecting that the development of nanofactories could be done in 20 years for “on the order of” one billion dollars.

Artificial molecular motor controls molecular transformation

Posted by Jim Lewis on December 30th, 2011

A four-step unidirectional molecular motor driven by light and temperature changes catalyzes different chemical reactions at different steps of its rotary cycle.

Arrays of artificial molecular machines could lead to atomically precise nanotechnology

Posted by Jim Lewis on December 29th, 2011

A tutorial review available after free registration presents a theory-based exploration of the difficulty in moving from simple molecular switches to arrays of artificial molecular machines capable to doing substantial, useful external work.

RNA CAD tool for synthetic biology may facilitate RNA nanotechnology

Posted by Jim Lewis on December 27th, 2011

RNA CAD tools developed for RNA-regulated control of gene expression in synthetic biology successfully engineered metabolic pathways in bacteria. Will engineering RNA-based genetic control systems lead to design tools for other RNA-based molecular machine systems?

Tutorial review of the promise of artificial molecular machines

Posted by Jim Lewis on December 11th, 2011

A tutorial review addresses the distinction between the many simple artificial molecular devices that are currently available and truly effective artificial molecular machines that would mimic the ubiquitous molecular machines present in living systems.

Lecture by Eric Drexler at Oxford on physical law and the future of nanotechnology (video)

Posted by Jim Lewis on December 6th, 2011

In a lecture at Oxford Eric Drexler argued that atomically precise manufacturing will be the next great revolution in the material basis of civilization, and discussed how we can establish reliable knowledge about key aspects of such technologies.

An artificial molecular clock to control artificial molecular machines

Posted by Jim Lewis on November 4th, 2011

The oscillating synthesis and degradation of regulatory RNA molecules was used to produce a molecular clock to control the opening and closing of a DNA tweezers, and also to control the production of another RNA molecule to alter the fluorescence of a dye molecule.

Self-replication achieved using structural DNA nanotechnology

Posted by Jim Lewis on October 26th, 2011

Tiles made from DNA helices have been made to self-assemble into a more complex structure, which then was used to seed the formation of a complementary structure. This second structure in turn seeded the formation of multiple copies of the first structure.

Engineered bacteria provide new tool for nanotechnology protein design

Posted by Jim Lewis on September 26th, 2011

Engineered bacteria that incorporate unnatural amino acids at multiple positions provide a new tool that may facilitate designing proteins to fold more predictably into molecular machinery components.

Mechanical force splits molecule that cannot otherwise be split

Posted by Jim Lewis on September 16th, 2011

Ultrasound was used to pull on polymer chains attached to opposite sides of a chemically almost inert molecular ring, splitting it into its two components.

First direct measurement of force generated by an individual synthetic molecular machine

Posted by Jim Lewis on August 29th, 2011

News articles by Jon Cartwright on the Chemistry World news site and by Michael Berger at Nanowerk describe a significant molecular machine milestone achieved by the research groups of David A. Leigh (winner of the 2007 Foresight Institute Feynman Prize in Nanotechnology for Theory) and Anne-Sophie Duwez. The research was reported in Nature Nanotechnology [abstract]. [...]