Foresight Nanotech Institute Logo
Image of nano

Archive for the 'Artificial Molecular Machines' Category

Electric motor made from a single molecule (video)

Posted by Jim Lewis on September 6th, 2011

Electrons from a scanning tunneling microscope cause a molecule of butyl methyl sulfide to rotate about a single sulfur atom attached to a copper surface.

First direct measurement of force generated by an individual synthetic molecular machine

Posted by Jim Lewis on August 29th, 2011

News articles by Jon Cartwright on the Chemistry World news site and by Michael Berger at Nanowerk describe a significant molecular machine milestone achieved by the research groups of David A. Leigh (winner of the 2007 Foresight Institute Feynman Prize in Nanotechnology for Theory) and Anne-Sophie Duwez. The research was reported in Nature Nanotechnology [abstract]. [...]

2011 Foresight Institute Feynman Prize deadline is September 30, 2011

Posted by Jim Lewis on July 25th, 2011

Submit your own work or nominate a colleague for the 2011 Foresight Institute Feynman Prizes.

A four-artificial-neuron network from 112 DNA strands

Posted by Jim Lewis on July 22nd, 2011

A neural network made from 112 DNA strands organized into four artificial neurons was trained with four pieces of information to answer questions.

American Chemical Society grant to study molecular gears

Posted by Jim Lewis on July 14th, 2011

The American Chemical Society Petroleum Research Fund has awarded a grant to study the development of molecular gears for use in future molecular machines. From an Austin College news release “Chemist awarded $50,000 grant“ Dr. Stephanie Gould, assistant professor of chemistry at Austin College, has been awarded a $50,000 grant from the American Chemical Society [...]

An evolution machine to accelerate nanotechnology development?

Posted by Jim Lewis on July 8th, 2011

Will an inexpensive automated evolution machine accelerate the development of molecular machine systems by simultaneously evolving multiple parts to improve function?

New book on molecular machines

Posted by Jim Lewis on June 20th, 2011

A new book collects the papers and discussions from the 2007 Solvay Conference “From Noncovalent Assemblies to Molecular Machines”.

Foresight 25th anniversary: Open reception June 24, SrAssoc banquet June 25

Posted by Christine Peterson on June 16th, 2011

I. Foresight@Google: Registration Deadline – Wed June 22nd II.  Open Foresight Reception in Palo Alto – Friday June 24th III. Senior Associates Reunion Banquet – Saturday June 25th IV. Thiel Foundation’s 20Under20 to attend Foresight@Google ================================== I. Foresight@Google Registration Deadline – Wednesday June 22nd Foresight@Google – June 24-26, 2011 25th Anniversary Conference Celebration & Reunion Weekend [...]

Theoretical work establishes structural stability of nanoscale diamond structures

Posted by Jim Lewis on June 10th, 2011

Computational studies show that small diamond structures of the type that might serve as nanoparts in diamondoid molecular machinery are structurally stable.

Computational circuit built from 74 small DNA molecules (with video)

Posted by Jim Lewis on June 9th, 2011

A biochemical circuit built from 74 small DNA molecules demonstrates an approach that may enable embedded control of molecular devices.

Foresight@Google: Full Program of Speakers posted!

Posted by Christine Peterson on June 2nd, 2011

We are proud to announce our final conference program for Foresight@Google‘s 25th Anniversary Conference Celebration, held June 25-26 in Mountain View, CA.  For $50 off registration use code: NANODOT This weekend – full of plenary talks, panels, and breakout sessions – is a unique opportunity to be stimulated, enlightened and inspired by direct interaction with [...]

Computer simulation of evolution of primordial molecular machine

Posted by Jim Lewis on June 1st, 2011

A Monte-Carlo simulation shows that a simple self-replicating RNA-like molecule in a specific protective environment could evolve the ability to translate a genetic code to produce peptides.

New grants to fund molecular machine research in The Netherlands

Posted by Jim Lewis on May 23rd, 2011

New research grants will support exploration of how molecular machines function.

TODAY is the last day for early rate on Foresight@Google

Posted by Christine Peterson on May 17th, 2011

Midnight tonight Pacific time is the deadline for the early registration rate on Foresight@Google, our 25th Anniversary Conference and Celebration. Check it out here: http://foresight.org/reunion Past participants have said: “This is mind candy for my soul. Having attended for two years now, this event stands alone in my mind as an opportunity to explore new horizons, [...]

Confining enzymes in specially engineered nanoporous materials may advance nanotechnology

Posted by Jim Lewis on April 13th, 2011

Engineering both the pore size and chemical functionality of nanoporous materials affects both the secondary structure and the catalytic activity of the enzymes confined in the nanopores.

AFM visualization of molecular robot moving along DNA scaffold (with video)

Posted by Jim Lewis on March 21st, 2011

Researchers in the UK and Japan use atomic force microscopy to visualize a DNA molecular robot moving along a 100-nm DNA track.

Work theoretically extracted from molecular motor

Posted by Jim Lewis on March 10th, 2011

Computational work links optically-induced molecular shape change to change in DNA structure to extract useful work.

Self-assembly of a molecular piston

Posted by Jim Lewis on March 4th, 2011

A French and Chinese collaboration has designed a molecular piston that self-assembles to form a complex stable enough that disassembly is very slow compared to the sliding motion of the piston.

DNA molecular robots learn to walk in any direction along a branched track

Posted by Jim Lewis on February 23rd, 2011

In yet another in a long list of improvements to DNA based molecular machines, DNA molecular robots learn to walk in any direction along a branched track.

Molecular machine switches magnetic state at room temperature

Posted by Jim Lewis on January 29th, 2011

Irradiation with two wavelengths of visible light switches the position of a nitrogen atom close to a nickel ion, and in the process switches the magnetic state of the nickel ion.