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Archive for the 'Molecular manufacturing' Category

Designing novel protein backbones through digital evolution

Posted by Jim Lewis on January 17th, 2017

Computational recombination of small elements of structure from known protein structures generates a vast library of designs that balance protein stability with the potential for new functions and novel interactions.

Adding modular hydrogen-bond networks to protein design

Posted by Jim Lewis on January 15th, 2017

Computer designed networks of hydrogen bonds allow programming specific interactions of protein interfaces, facilitating programming molecular recognition.

A brief history of nanotechnology

Posted by Jim Lewis on January 3rd, 2017

A historian looks at nanotechnology as utopian or dystopian vision, real-life research and development, and why emerging technologies are such compelling topics.

New Funding Opportunity from U.S. DOE

Posted by Jim Lewis on January 1st, 2017

A new funding opportunity from the Advanced Manufacturing Office, U.S. Department of Energy, incudes a subtopic on Atomically Precise Manufacturing

DOE office focusing on atomically precise manufacturing

Posted by Jim Lewis on December 31st, 2016

Longtime Foresight member Dave Forrest is leading DOE’s Advanced Manufacturing Office in advocating atomically precise manufacturing to transform the U.S. manufacturing base.

Nobel Prize in Chemistry recognizes molecular machines

Posted by Jim Lewis on October 10th, 2016

Sir J. Fraser Stoddart, winner of 2007 Foresight Feynman Prize for Experiment, shares the 2016 Chemistry Nobel for the design and synthesis of molecular machines.

Assembling a large, stable, icosahedral protein molecular cage

Posted by Jim Lewis on September 9th, 2016

A trimeric protein was designed to self assemble into a 60 unit icosahedron with a roomy interior that might find use to ferry molecular cargo into cells or as a chemical reactor.

Chemical fuel keeps molecular motor moving

Posted by Jim Lewis on September 4th, 2016

Removing the necessity of providing several different chemical fuels in a series of distinct steps, a novel chemically-fueled molecular motor autonomously produces movement as long as the fuel supply lasts.

Rational improvement of DNA nanodevice function

Posted by Jim Lewis on August 13th, 2016

Recent research documents a structure-based rational design strategy combining molecular dynamics and single molecule imaging to improve the performance of a DNA tweezers that accurately positions an enzyme and its cofactor.

Atomically precise location of dopants a step toward quantum computers

Posted by Jim Lewis on August 4th, 2016

Precise matching of STM images and theoretical calculations provides exact lattice locations of dopant atoms, advancing the prospects for silicon-based quantum computers.

Watching individual chemical bonds during a reaction

Posted by Jim Lewis on August 2nd, 2016

Combining computational nanotechnology with a noncontact-atomic force microscope probe tipped by a single CO molecule allowed researchers to visualize the dance of individual chemical bonds during a complex organic reaction on a silver surface.

Peptoid nanosheets assemble by different design rule

Posted by Jim Lewis on July 31st, 2016

Chains of monomers joined by non-biological peptoid bonds follow different rules of self-assembly and form structures not found in chains joined by the peptide bonds used to form proteins.

Engineered protein assembles molecules into atomically precise lattice

Posted by Jim Lewis on July 30th, 2016

An engineered protein controls the assembly of C60 fullerene molecules into an atomically precise lattice that conducts electricity while neither component alone would.

Protein design provides a novel metabolic path for carbon fixation

Posted by Jim Lewis on June 8th, 2016

Computational design of an enzyme that carboligates three one-carbon molecules to form one three-carbon molecule, an activity that does not exist in nature, provides proof-of-principle for a novel metabolic pathway for carbon fixation.

Triple helices stabilize macroscopic crystals for DNA nanotechnology

Posted by Jim Lewis on May 5th, 2016

A DNA strand capable of forming a triple helix with a portion of the DNA double helices in a macroscopic DNA crystal enhances the weak interactions holding the crystal together so that the crystal remains stable in the absence of a high ionic strength environment.

Macroscopic DNA crystals from molecular tensegrity triangles

Posted by Jim Lewis on May 2nd, 2016

Structural DNA nanotechnology: progress toward a precise self-assembling three dimensional scaffold by building macroscopic crystals from nanoscale structures.

Five ionized atoms provide scalable implementation of quantum computation algorithm

Posted by Jim Lewis on April 3rd, 2016

Five calcium ions held several micrometers apart in an ion trap and manipulated by laser pulses implement Shor’s factorization algorithm more efficiently than previous implementations.

Tightly-fitted DNA parts form dynamic nanomachine

Posted by Jim Lewis on March 10th, 2016

A rotor with DNA origami parts held together by an engineered tight fit instead of by covalent bonds can revolve freely, driven by Brownian motion and dwelling at engineered docking sites.

Multiple advances in de novo protein design and prediction

Posted by Jim Lewis on February 14th, 2016

New families of protein structures, barrel proteins for positioning small molecules, self-assembling protein arrays, and precision sculpting of protein architectures highlight de novo protein design advances.

Rational design of protein architectures not found in nature

Posted by Jim Lewis on February 11th, 2016

Computational design of proteins satisfying predetermined geometric constraints produced stable proteins with the designed structure that are not found in nature.