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Archive for the 'Molecular manufacturing' Category

Protein design provides a novel metabolic path for carbon fixation

Posted by Jim Lewis on June 8th, 2016

Computational design of an enzyme that carboligates three one-carbon molecules to form one three-carbon molecule, an activity that does not exist in nature, provides proof-of-principle for a novel metabolic pathway for carbon fixation.

Triple helices stabilize macroscopic crystals for DNA nanotechnology

Posted by Jim Lewis on May 5th, 2016

A DNA strand capable of forming a triple helix with a portion of the DNA double helices in a macroscopic DNA crystal enhances the weak interactions holding the crystal together so that the crystal remains stable in the absence of a high ionic strength environment.

Macroscopic DNA crystals from molecular tensegrity triangles

Posted by Jim Lewis on May 2nd, 2016

Structural DNA nanotechnology: progress toward a precise self-assembling three dimensional scaffold by building macroscopic crystals from nanoscale structures.

Five ionized atoms provide scalable implementation of quantum computation algorithm

Posted by Jim Lewis on April 3rd, 2016

Five calcium ions held several micrometers apart in an ion trap and manipulated by laser pulses implement Shor’s factorization algorithm more efficiently than previous implementations.

Tightly-fitted DNA parts form dynamic nanomachine

Posted by Jim Lewis on March 10th, 2016

A rotor with DNA origami parts held together by an engineered tight fit instead of by covalent bonds can revolve freely, driven by Brownian motion and dwelling at engineered docking sites.

Multiple advances in de novo protein design and prediction

Posted by Jim Lewis on February 14th, 2016

New families of protein structures, barrel proteins for positioning small molecules, self-assembling protein arrays, and precision sculpting of protein architectures highlight de novo protein design advances.

Rational design of protein architectures not found in nature

Posted by Jim Lewis on February 11th, 2016

Computational design of proteins satisfying predetermined geometric constraints produced stable proteins with the designed structure that are not found in nature.

De novo protein design space extends far beyond biology

Posted by Jim Lewis on February 3rd, 2016

A fully automated design protocol generates dozens of designs for proteins based on helix-loop-helix-loop repeat units that are very stable, have crystal structures that match the design, have very different overall shapes, and are unrelated to any natural protein.

DNA nanotechnology controls which molecules enter cells

Posted by Jim Lewis on January 13th, 2016

DNA building blocks mimic biological ion channels to more precisely control which molecules can cross a biological membrane.

Molecular arm grabs, transports, releases molecular cargo

Posted by Jim Lewis on January 12th, 2016

A molecular robotic arm synthesized from small synthetic organic molecules uses cyclic changes in pH and other reaction conditions to grab and release a cargo molecule, and swing the cargo back and forth between the two ends of the molecular platform.

Using DNA nanotechnology to position molecules with atomic precision

Posted by Jim Lewis on December 9th, 2015

German researchers have used scaffolded DNA origami to adjust the angle of a DNA hinge joint by altering the length of special “adjuster helices”, causing molecules attached to the sides of the hinge to be displaced by as little as 0.04 nm.

Architecture for atomically precise quantum computer in silicon

Posted by Jim Lewis on November 9th, 2015

Building on previous work on single atom transistors and single atom qubits, Australian researchers have incorporated a quantum error correction code to make possible a scalable 3D silicon chip architecture that could lead to operational quantum computers.

One-directional rotation in a new artificial molecular motor

Posted by Jim Lewis on November 5th, 2015

Independent rotation of two wheels attached to either end of an axle has been achieved in a light-driven artificial molecular motor, suggesting a basis for a nanometer-scale transport system.

Chirality-assisted synthesis a new tool for nanotechnology

Posted by Jim Lewis on October 30th, 2015

A novel application of supramolecular chemistry allows molecules to join in only one direction, providing a new way to control the shape of large molecules.

Surface assisted self-assembly of DNA origami nanostructures

Posted by Jim Lewis on October 26th, 2015

A lipid bilayer supported by a mica surface assisted the mobile self-assembly of DNA nanostructures of various shapes into micrometer-scale 2D lattices.

Free online edition of The Feynman Lectures on Physics

Posted by Jim Lewis on October 25th, 2015

A free to read online edition of the classic 3-volume physics text developed from Richard Feynman’s legendary Cal Tech physics lectures, specially designed for online reading, has been made available by the California Institute of Technology and the Feynman Lectures Website.

Foresight co-founder on the future of the human lifespan

Posted by Jim Lewis on October 6th, 2015

Optimized Geek podcast featured Christine Peterson on the future of nanotechnology, human lifespan, artificial intelligence, finding love, and other topics.

Atomically precise boron doping of graphene nanoribbons

Posted by Jim Lewis on September 28th, 2015

The ability to dope graphene nanoribbons with boron atoms to atomic precision opens a range of possible new applications, from chemical sensing to nanoelectronics to photocatalysis to battery electrodes.

Review of artificial molecular machines and their controlled motions

Posted by Jim Lewis on September 18th, 2015

An extensive review of artificial molecular machines, their large-amplitude motions, and the changes these motions produce, emphasizes small molecules and the central role of chemistry in their design and operation.

Addressable molecular machines arranged in a porous crystal

Posted by Jim Lewis on September 10th, 2015

Simple molecular switches based upon bistable mechanically interlocked molecules can be incorporated within pre-assembled metal organic frameworks and addressed electrochemically.