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Archive for the 'Molecular manufacturing' Category

New Darpa program may accelerate synthetic biology path to advanced nanotechnology

Posted by Jim Lewis on May 26th, 2012

Darpa has launched a “Living Foundries” program to bring an engineering perspective to synthetic biology to greatly accelerate progress through standardization and modularization.

Foresight Institute on Singularity Hub (video)

Posted by Jim Lewis on May 12th, 2012

Recent interview touches on new Foresight programs and issues in nanotechnology development

Adding to the toolbox for making complex molecular machines

Posted by Jim Lewis on April 4th, 2012

A set of rationally engineered transcriptional regulators for yeast will make it easier to build complex molecular machine systems in yeast, some of which may become useful additions to pathway technologies for atomically precise manufacturing and productive nanosystems.

DNA nanotechnology-based nanorobot delivers cell suicide message to cancer cells

Posted by Jim Lewis on March 8th, 2012

Functioning DNA nanorobots to deliver specific molecular signals to cells were designed by combining DNA origami, DNA aptamers, and DNA logic gates.

Nanotechnology, digital fabrication, and innovation at TED

Posted by Jim Lewis on March 2nd, 2012

A talk at TEDxBerkeley includes nanotechnology among the options for digital fabrication, one of five new rules of innovation.

Novel RNA structural motifs expand tool kit for RNA nanotechnology

Posted by Jim Lewis on February 26th, 2012

New computational methods to explore the rapidly expanding collection of high resolution three-dimensional RNA structures reveal new RNA structural motifs, identifying additional building blocks for complex RNA nanostructures.

Machine learning may improve molecular design for nanotechnology

Posted by Jim Lewis on February 22nd, 2012

A set of machine learning programs can now predict properties of small organic molecules as accurately as can calculations based upon the Schrödinger equation, but in milliseconds rather than hours.

Atomically-precise positioning of a single atom transistor-VIDEO

Posted by Jim Lewis on February 19th, 2012

Researchers in Australia and the US have demonstrated a working transistor by placing of single atom of phosphorous with atomic precision between gates made of wires only a few phosphorous atoms wide. This demonstration points to possibly extending current computer technology to the atomic scale.

DNA motor navigates network of DNA tracks

Posted by Jim Lewis on January 31st, 2012

Scientists at Kyoto University and the University of Oxford have combined DNA origami and DNA motors to take another step toward programmed artificial molecular assembly lines.

Crowd-sourced protein design a promising path to advanced nanotechnology

Posted by Jim Lewis on January 24th, 2012

Foldit game players have again out-performed scientists in protein design, this time improving the design of a protein designed from scratch to catalyze Diels-Alder cycloadditions.

Foresight co-founder among panelists discussing role of technology in human existence

Posted by Jim Lewis on January 23rd, 2012

Human life after advanced nanotechnology has been developed will be fundamentally different from life up until that point.

Magnetic storage systems shrink from a million atoms per bit to twelve

Posted by Jim Lewis on January 13th, 2012

An array of 96 iron atoms on a copper nitride surface, assembled using an STM and used to write a byte, demonstrates how small magnetic storage could shrink and may lead to novel nanomaterials for quantum computers.

Advanced nanofactories in twenty years?

Posted by Jim Lewis on January 12th, 2012

An article in The Guardian quotes Christine Peterson and Robert Freitas on the vision of molecular manufacturing. Freitas is quoted as expecting that the development of nanofactories could be done in 20 years for “on the order of” one billion dollars.

Artificial molecular motor controls molecular transformation

Posted by Jim Lewis on December 30th, 2011

A four-step unidirectional molecular motor driven by light and temperature changes catalyzes different chemical reactions at different steps of its rotary cycle.

Arrays of artificial molecular machines could lead to atomically precise nanotechnology

Posted by Jim Lewis on December 29th, 2011

A tutorial review available after free registration presents a theory-based exploration of the difficulty in moving from simple molecular switches to arrays of artificial molecular machines capable to doing substantial, useful external work.

RNA CAD tool for synthetic biology may facilitate RNA nanotechnology

Posted by Jim Lewis on December 27th, 2011

RNA CAD tools developed for RNA-regulated control of gene expression in synthetic biology successfully engineered metabolic pathways in bacteria. Will engineering RNA-based genetic control systems lead to design tools for other RNA-based molecular machine systems?

Mechanical pressure produces atomically-precise, multifunctional 2D sheets

Posted by Jim Lewis on December 26th, 2011

Protein-like structures called peptoids can be formed into stable, free-floating nanosheets.

Christine Peterson on current state and future potential of nanotechnology

Posted by Jim Lewis on December 21st, 2011

When can we expect advanced nanomachinery to be commercialized? Will any technologies not be affected in some way by advanced nanotechnology?

Tutorial review of the promise of artificial molecular machines

Posted by Jim Lewis on December 11th, 2011

A tutorial review addresses the distinction between the many simple artificial molecular devices that are currently available and truly effective artificial molecular machines that would mimic the ubiquitous molecular machines present in living systems.

Lecture by Eric Drexler at Oxford on physical law and the future of nanotechnology (video)

Posted by Jim Lewis on December 6th, 2011

In a lecture at Oxford Eric Drexler argued that atomically precise manufacturing will be the next great revolution in the material basis of civilization, and discussed how we can establish reliable knowledge about key aspects of such technologies.