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Archive for the 'Nanobusiness' Category

Powerful nanoengine built from coated nanoparticles

Posted by Jim Lewis on June 5th, 2016

A nanoengine 100 times more powerful than known nanomotors and muscles was demonstrated using the aggregation and dispersal of gold nanoparticles coated with a polymer that undergoes a rapid transition from hydrophobic to hydrophilic.

Inexpensive transparent conductors from correlated metal nanostructures

Posted by Jim Lewis on January 6th, 2016

Highly correlated electron motions resembling electron liquids rather than electron gases, and found in some transition metal oxides, may enable inexpensive substitution for expensive displays.

Octopodal nanoparticles combine catalytic, plasmonic functions

Posted by Jim Lewis on December 11th, 2015

Eight-armed nanoparticles of gold coated with a gold-palladium alloy proved to be both efficient plasmonic sensors and efficient catalysts, even though gold alone is not normally a good catalyst and palladium is a poor plasmonic material.

Conference video: New Methods of Exploring, Analyzing, and Predicting Molecular Interactions

Posted by Jim Lewis on October 8th, 2015

Prof. Art Olson discussed how we understand what we cannot see directly, how we integrate data from different sources, and how to develop software tools to move forward.

Nanotechnology provides sensors for liver-on-chip drug testing

Posted by Jim Lewis on September 2nd, 2015

Adding nanotechnology-based optoelectronic sensors to human cells cultured on a chip keeps the cells healthy long enough to replace animal testing with a human liver-on-a-chip.

Foresight co-sponsors Berkeley Bench to Market event

Posted by Jim Lewis on July 30th, 2015

To educate potential entrepreneurs on strategies for moving discoveries from the benchtop to successful commercialization, Foresight co-sponsored an event in the “Ph.D. to Startup” Workshop Series of the Berkeley Postdoc Entrepreneur Program.

Conference video: Regenesis: Bionano

Posted by Jim Lewis on June 9th, 2015

At the 2013 Conference George Church presented an overview of his work in developing applications of atomically precise nanotechnology intended for commercialization, from data storage to medical nanorobots to genomic sequencing to genomic engineering to mapping individual neuronal functioning in whole brains.

Nanoparticles shepherd DNA into cells to regulate immune response

Posted by Jim Lewis on May 6th, 2015

DNA sequences designed to either stimulate a specific immune response or to down-regulate an undesirable response deliver superior performance when organized on nanoparticles to reach their intended cellular targets.

Nanowires and bacteria harnessed for artificial photosynthesis

Posted by Jim Lewis on May 4th, 2015

A prototype system to produce chemicals and fuels from sequestered carbon dioxide, water, and sunlight uses semiconductor nanowires to produce electron-hole pairs, which are then used by two types of bacteria to produce oxygen and a variety of useful chemical products.

Science and technology roadmaps for nanotechnology

Posted by Jim Lewis on May 3rd, 2015

A European Science and Technology Roadmap for Graphene, Related Two-Dimensional Crystals, and Hybrid Systems hints at the opportunities to be harvested from, and the need for, the development of atomically precise manufacturing (APM).

Nanotechnology making 3D transistors by directed molecular self-assembly

Posted by Jim Lewis on March 1st, 2015

IBM researchers engineered a class of molecules called block copolymers to self-assemble into dense patterns to extend the capabilities of photolithography.

DNA nanotechnology and the atoms to micrometer nanofabrication gap

Posted by Jim Lewis on September 26th, 2014

A new DARPA program seeks to bridge the gap from atoms to macroscale product manufacture in two steps, the first of which is from atoms to micrometer-scale feedstocks. DNA origami may be part of the solution.

DARPA announces new program on nanoscale assembly and integration

Posted by Jim Lewis on September 1st, 2014

Register by Sept. 5 to attend a Proposers Day webinar on either Sept. 9 or 11 to learn the technical objectives of DARPA’s new “Atoms to product: Aiming to make nanoscale benefits life-sized” program.

Recent cases of 'accessible' high-tech: Open source chips & Origami robots

Posted by Stephanie C on August 22nd, 2014

Nanotech promises more commonplace access to advanced technology as material and fabrication costs fall and traditional barriers to innovation are removed. Examples are already being seen globally: more access to laptops and cell phones in developing countries, desktop 3D printers, a surge in establishment of shared-use research facilities, etc. A couple recent cases getting attention [...]

Surprisingly real value from virtual reality

Posted by Stephanie C on August 21st, 2014

Speaking of big computation, cyberspace isn’t yet as potent as Neal Stephenson portrayed in Snow Crash and subsequent books, but it’s getting there. A new article in the Wall Street Journal online titled Can World of Warcraft Game Skills Help Land a Job? states that some job seekers are adding gaming skills to their resumes [...]

Big computation brings your ideas into 3D

Posted by Stephanie C on August 14th, 2014

What 3D printers are doing to facilitate fabrication, 3D drawing programs are surpassing to facilitate design. As described at ScienceDaily.com, two systems referred to as “powerful” and “spectacular” are being highlighted at the SIGGRAPH 2014 conference in Vancouver this week: True2Form (out of University of British Columbia) brings 2D sketches into 3D (excerpt from SD [...]

Emergence of nanobiotechnology points to importance of deep collaboration

Posted by Jim Lewis on August 8th, 2014

Study shows more than 500 firms involved in nanobiotechnology, which is expected to soon triple in size. Research points to the importance of broad networks and deep collaborations.

Photos from 2014 Foresight Technical Conference

Posted by Jim Lewis on June 24th, 2014

The photos from the 2014 Foresight Technical Conference highlight entrepreneurial efforts in space, biotechnology, and life extension.

Expanded DNA alphabet provides more options for nanotechnology

Posted by Jim Lewis on May 14th, 2014

A bacterium has been engineered to stably propagate a DNA written with six letters instead of the usual four, greatly expanding the number of amino acids, both natural and synthetic, that can be genetically encoded. Further work could lead to novel proteins incorporating these additional amino acids, and from there to novel materials, devices, and machines.

Nanotechnology to provide better solar cells, optical devices

Posted by Jim Lewis on May 9th, 2014

A novel method to control the configuration of atoms in semiconductors grown on graphene will make possible a vast array of new optical devices, including better solar cells.