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Archive for the 'Roadmaps' Category

From de novo protein design to molecular machine systems

Posted by Jim Lewis on January 30th, 2017

A review from the group leading recent rapid progress in de novo protein design describes the successes, identifies the remaining challenges, and heralds the advance “from the Stone Age to the Iron Age” in protein design.

New Funding Opportunity from U.S. DOE

Posted by Jim Lewis on January 1st, 2017

A new funding opportunity from the Advanced Manufacturing Office, U.S. Department of Energy, incudes a subtopic on Atomically Precise Manufacturing

DOE office focusing on atomically precise manufacturing

Posted by Jim Lewis on December 31st, 2016

Longtime Foresight member Dave Forrest is leading DOE’s Advanced Manufacturing Office in advocating atomically precise manufacturing to transform the U.S. manufacturing base.

Automated design of polyhedral meshes for DNA origami

Posted by Jim Lewis on August 7th, 2015

An automated design process folds arbitrary meshes to produce DNA origami structures difficult to design by previous methods, including more open structures that are stable in ionic conditions used in biological assays.

Google Tech Talk video by Feynman Prize Winner

Posted by Jim Lewis on June 24th, 2015

Designing and building spiroligomers, robust building blocks of various 3D shapes made from unnatural amino acids, decorated with various functional groups, and linked rigidly together by pairs of bonds, and a new approach to nanotechnology design software.

Preserving protein function in DNA-protein nanostructures

Posted by Jim Lewis on June 1st, 2015

Linking proteins to DNA scaffolds to produce complex functional nanostructures can require chemistry that damages protein function. A new systematic approach avoids exposing proteins to damaging conditions.

Science and technology roadmaps for nanotechnology

Posted by Jim Lewis on May 3rd, 2015

A European Science and Technology Roadmap for Graphene, Related Two-Dimensional Crystals, and Hybrid Systems hints at the opportunities to be harvested from, and the need for, the development of atomically precise manufacturing (APM).

New scaffold for nanotechnology engineered from amyloid-like proteins

Posted by Jim Lewis on April 4th, 2015

Design and computational simulation of amyloid proteins of diverse functions from diverse sources enable the self-assembly of proteins that could provide scaffolds for diverse applications.

Atomically precise manufacturing as the future of nanotechnology

Posted by Jim Lewis on March 8th, 2015

A commentary over at Gizmodo argues that ideas about molecular manufacturing that sounded like science fiction in 1986 now sound more like science fact.

Are nanorobots and atomically precise manufacturing becoming mainstream nanotechnology?

Posted by Jim Lewis on March 7th, 2015

The idea that nanorobots fabricated by atomically precise manufacturing processes are a likely part of our future, and that this is a good thing, is appearing more frequently, largely as a result of Drexler’s recent book Radical Abundance.

What sort of abundance will nanotechnology bring?

Posted by Jim Lewis on January 11th, 2015

One example is presented of how well the meme is spreading that nanotechnology will evolve toward atomically precise manufacturing that will in turn bring forth a world of abundance.

Computational framework for structural DNA nanotechnology

Posted by Jim Lewis on December 27th, 2014

A more general computational framework predicts the structures of 2D and 3D-curved DNA nanostructures impossible to predict using previously available computational methods. May lead to 3D-printing DNA nanostructures?

Scaffolded DNA origami improvements advance DNA nanotechnology

Posted by Jim Lewis on September 25th, 2014

A 10-fold larger breadboard and 350-fold lower DNA synthesis costs make DNA origami a more useful stepping-stone toward atomically precise manufacturing.

What kind of nanomachines will advanced nanotechnology use?

Posted by Jim Lewis on August 31st, 2014

An interview with UK nanotechnologist Richard Jones argues that the surest and most efficient path to advanced nanomachine function will incorporate or mimic biomolecular nanomachinery rather than scaled down rigid conventional machinery.

A bird's-eye view of half a century of nanotechnology

Posted by Jim Lewis on May 7th, 2014

Reviewing Eric Drexler’s Radical Abundance, Phil Bowermaster provides an informed and insightful overview of the controversies that greeted the proposal for a nanotechnology aimed at developing a practical technology for atomically precise manufacturing. Along the way he shows how Drexler’s outlook evolved from 1986 to 2013.

Physicists suppress 'stiction' force that bedevils microscale machinery

Posted by Jim Lewis on April 19th, 2014

A possible top-down path to atomically precise manufacturing that passes through microscale machinery might be rendered easier because of recent progress in suppressing the Casimir force, which contributes to the ‘stiction’ problem often encountered with microelectromechanical systems.

Integrating DNA nanotechnology and RNA to transport nanoparticles along nanotubes

Posted by Jim Lewis on January 21st, 2014

A possible forerunner to a future molecular assembly line uses an artificial DNA motor to transport an artificial nanoparticle along a carbon nanotube track.

New Report: Nano-solutions for the 21st century

Posted by Stephanie C on December 20th, 2013

A recently released technology report titled Nano-solutions for the 21st century outlines nanotech-based solutions to global challenges. Several years in the making, the report was co-authored by Dennis Pamlin, Research Fellow at the Chinese Academy of Social Sciences Research Center for Sustainable Development (RCSD web site currently in Chinese only), and Eric Drexler, Academic Visitor [...]

Computational design of protein-small molecule interactions

Posted by Jim Lewis on September 26th, 2013

A major advance in the computational design of proteins that bind tightly to specific small molecules will facilitate several technologies, possibly including the development of atomically precise manufacturing.

Testing and improving scaffolded DNA origami for molecular nanotechnology

Posted by Jim Lewis on December 19th, 2012

In two different sets of experiments a German research group has shown that scaffolded DNA origami can be used to assemble complex structures with precise sub-nanometer positional control, and that constant temperature reaction can greatly increase yields and decrease production times.