Foresight Nanotech Institute Logo
Image of nano

Archive for the 'Reports & publications' Category

New book on molecular machines

Posted by Jim Lewis on June 20th, 2011

A new book collects the papers and discussions from the 2007 Solvay Conference “From Noncovalent Assemblies to Molecular Machines”.

Update and summary of potential applications of medical nanorobotics

Posted by Jim Lewis on January 10th, 2011

Robert A. Freitas Jr. has made available his chapter on nanorobotics from the book The Future of Aging.

Request for public comment on National Nanotechnology Initiative’s Strategic Plan

Posted by Jim Lewis on November 5th, 2010

US National Nanotechnology Initiative wants your comments on its strategic plan.

New book addresses nanotechnology education and workforce training

Posted by Jim Lewis on November 3rd, 2010

A book on nanotechnology education and workforce training written by Judith Light Feather and Miguel Aznar

Vote and comment on IMM/Foresight statement to President’s Council

Posted by Christine Peterson on June 1st, 2010

The U.S. President’s Council on Advisors on Science and Technology requested public input on a number of manufacturing topics including “molecular-level, atomically precise production.” Foresight joined with our sister organization IMM to produce a statement on Atomically Precise Manufacturing, now posted on the OpenPCAST site, with public voting and commenting still continuing, so join in the [...]

Software responsibility as model for nanotech?

Posted by Christine Peterson on January 4th, 2010

Foresight ally Jeff Ubois has a new book out, published by Fondazione Giannino Bassetti, Conversations on Innovation, Power, and Responsibility.  Yours truly is quoted.  An excerpt: Peterson suggests that a closer look at the software developers might provide some clues about responsible cultures of innovation. “If you really want to know how to create a sense of responsibility, [...]

Royal Society classic science papers

Posted by J. Storrs Hall on November 30th, 2009

The Royal society has a new website making freely available a selection of classic papers from the history of science. (h/t Luboš Motl’s The Reference Frame): I am just looking at an Isaac Newton’s letter about light and colors sent to the editor of Cambridge University Press in February 1671/72. It describes some Newton’s basic [...]

Climategate, or, how science works

Posted by J. Storrs Hall on November 25th, 2009

“Science advances, funeral by funeral.” (often attributed to Timothy Ferris) The blogosphere has been abuzz over the past week or so with the release of data — emails and program source and documentation — from the Climatic Research Unit at the University of East Anglia, one of the premier climatology research institutions in the world. [...]

EPA encourages input to develop risk management practices for nanotechnology

Posted by Jim Lewis on January 28th, 2009

Following up on recent posts about concern in the insurance industry and in Congress about risk management practices for (current and near-term) nanotechnology, David Forrest passes along this news of recent action at EPA: The EPA has published their Interim Report on the Nanomaterials Stewardship Program and continues to invite comment for the final version. [...]

Nanotechnology oversight issues moving forward in Congress

Posted by Jim Lewis on January 21st, 2009

The Project on Emerging Nanotechnologies, via AAAS EurekAlert, brings us an update on federal efforts to address the potential environmental, health and safety (EHS) risks posed by engineered nanomaterials. “New House bill addresses need for more risk research, oversight“: The House Science and Technology Committee [on January 15] introduced legislation that highlights the growing attention [...]

Graphitic memory

Posted by J. Storrs Hall on December 22nd, 2008

A recent paper from Feynman Prize winner James Tour’s group at Rice relates an interesting new form of memory based on a bistable 2-terminal graphitic switch. Once developed, the switch could form the basis of a high-density non-volatile storage which might replace flash devices (which are already beginning to replace magnetic disks). Rice press release

UK report urges more tests of health and environmental effects of nanotechnology products

Posted by Jim Lewis on November 14th, 2008

The report concludes that nanotech products are coming to market without adequate tests for safety based upon the unique properties of the nanomaterials.

American public remains uninformed about nanotechnology

Posted by Jim Lewis on October 7th, 2008

A recently released poll shows that the American public is largely uniformed about both nanotechnology and synthetic biology, and furthermore that the level of public awareness about nanotechnology has not changed since 2004.

US and European approaches to advanced nanotechnology implications compared

Posted by Jim Lewis on August 28th, 2008

Government-sponsored discussions of the implications for society of advanced nanotechnology and other emerging technologies have taken place and are ongoing in both the US and Europe. A recent Nanowerk Spotlight written by Michael Berger gives an update of deliberations in Europe and compares and contrasts the US and European approaches. From “Europe and the U.S. [...]

US citizens weigh in on nanotechnology for human enhancement

Posted by Jim Lewis on August 19th, 2008

The Center for Nanotechnology in Society at Arizona State University is one of two centers funded by the National Science Foundation to study nanotechnology in society. One of their tools for studying the impact of nanotech upon society is the National Citizens’ Technology Forum (NCTF). They have recently published the results of their National Citizens’ [...]

Open source nanotechnology for clean water

Posted by Christine Peterson on July 15th, 2008

From the conference report Setting an Agenda for the Social Studies of Nanotechnology (PDF): For example, researchers at Rice University have been working on the use of nanoparticles to absorb arsenic from drinking water supplies. Nanoscale iron oxide absorbs arsenic effi ciently, but in many countries implementing the process is either too expensive or technically [...]

National Citizen’s Technology Forum held on nanotechnology

Posted by Christine Peterson on May 9th, 2008

A while back Senior Associate Stuart Scott let us know that he had been selected to participate in a National Citizen’s Technology Forum process on nanotechnology, sponsored by Arizona State and University of North Carolina, among other schools. Presumably this is funded by the social science budget of the U.S. National Nanotechnology Initiative, via NSF. [...]

Nanotechnology experts comment on Roadmap for atomically precise manufacturing

Posted by Christine Peterson on January 30th, 2008

Below are comments from nanotechnology experts on yesterday’s release of the Technology Roadmap for Productive Nanosystems, a new roadmap for development of atomically precise manufacturing from Battelle and Foresight: Jim Von Ehr, CEO, Zyvex Labs “For the first time, progress across all key nanoscale disciplines has been brought together into R&D pathways leading to atomically-precise [...]

Nanotechnology Roadmap for Atomically Precise Manufacturing Now Available

Posted by Christine Peterson on January 29th, 2008

Dear Foresight members and friends: It is with great pleasure that we announce the availability of the first Technology Roadmap for Productive Nanosystems. Some of you have seen earlier drafts, but the document is now official. Files can be downloaded at: http://foresight.org/roadmaps Below is the text of the press release going out today. We look [...]

World Economic Forum takes on nanotechnology

Posted by Christine Peterson on January 28th, 2008

Nanowerk brings news that the World Economic Forum is both rewarding nanotechnology pioneers and taking a look at potential risks of nanoparticles. Excerpts: Over the past few years, the Global Risk Network team has released an annual report. This years’ report “Global Risks 2008″ (pdf download, 1.6 MB) was published two weeks ago. In it, [...]