Foresight Nanotech Institute Logo
Image of nano

Archive for the 'Computational nanotechnology' Category

Rational design of protein architectures not found in nature

Posted by Jim Lewis on February 11th, 2016

Computational design of proteins satisfying predetermined geometric constraints produced stable proteins with the designed structure that are not found in nature.

De novo protein design space extends far beyond biology

Posted by Jim Lewis on February 3rd, 2016

A fully automated design protocol generates dozens of designs for proteins based on helix-loop-helix-loop repeat units that are very stable, have crystal structures that match the design, have very different overall shapes, and are unrelated to any natural protein.

Conference video: Nanoscale Materials, Devices, and Processing Predicted from First Principles

Posted by Jim Lewis on January 15th, 2016

Prof. William Goddard presented four advances from his research group that enable going from first principles quantum mechanics calculations to realistic nanosystems of interest with millions or billions of atoms.

Conference video: Mythbusting Knowledge Transfer Mechanisms through Science Gateways

Posted by Jim Lewis on January 14th, 2016

Prof. Gerhard Klimeck described the success of nanoHUB.org, a science and engineering gateway providing online simulations through a web browser for nanotechnology research and education.

Electron tomography reveals precise positions of individual atoms in aperiodic material

Posted by Jim Lewis on January 11th, 2016

The positions of 3769 tungsten atoms in a tungsten needle segment were determined to a precision of 19 pm (0.019 nm), including the position of a single atom defect in the interior of the sample, by using aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy and computerized tomography.

Architecture for atomically precise quantum computer in silicon

Posted by Jim Lewis on November 9th, 2015

Building on previous work on single atom transistors and single atom qubits, Australian researchers have incorporated a quantum error correction code to make possible a scalable 3D silicon chip architecture that could lead to operational quantum computers.

Chirality-assisted synthesis a new tool for nanotechnology

Posted by Jim Lewis on October 30th, 2015

A novel application of supramolecular chemistry allows molecules to join in only one direction, providing a new way to control the shape of large molecules.

Conference video: New Methods of Exploring, Analyzing, and Predicting Molecular Interactions

Posted by Jim Lewis on October 8th, 2015

Prof. Art Olson discussed how we understand what we cannot see directly, how we integrate data from different sources, and how to develop software tools to move forward.

Atomically precise boron doping of graphene nanoribbons

Posted by Jim Lewis on September 28th, 2015

The ability to dope graphene nanoribbons with boron atoms to atomic precision opens a range of possible new applications, from chemical sensing to nanoelectronics to photocatalysis to battery electrodes.

Conference video: Bringing Computational Programmability to Nanostructured Surfaces

Posted by Jim Lewis on September 11th, 2015

Dr. Alex Wissner-Gross surveyed the interplay between programmability of bits and atoms in the development of technology, asking how the recent successes with programming bits can help nanotechnology progress in programming atoms.

Femtosecond imaging with near nanometer spatial resolution

Posted by Jim Lewis on August 31st, 2015

Analysis of multiple diffraction images provides high contrast, high quality, full field 3D imaging of surfaces illuminated by extreme ultraviolet photons from a tabletop laser.

Novel wireframe nanostructures from new DNA origami design process

Posted by Jim Lewis on August 18th, 2015

A new set of design rules enables constructing any wireframe nanostructure, which may lead to new medical applications and new nanomachines.

Conference video: Artificial Biochemistry with DNA

Posted by Jim Lewis on August 13th, 2015

Modeling DNA strand displacement cascades according to three simple rules can in principle mimic the temporal dynamics of any other chemical system, presenting a method to model regulatory networks even more complicated than those of biology.

Google Tech Talk video by Feynman Prize Winner

Posted by Jim Lewis on June 24th, 2015

Designing and building spiroligomers, robust building blocks of various 3D shapes made from unnatural amino acids, decorated with various functional groups, and linked rigidly together by pairs of bonds, and a new approach to nanotechnology design software.

Computational nanotechnology reveals complex interactions in double-walled carbon nanotubes

Posted by Jim Lewis on June 8th, 2015

Density functional theory calculations of the electronic properties of double-walled carbon nanotubes (DWCNTs) comprising two concentric zigzag tubes of different chiralities reveal complex effects upon the electronic band gap, identifying candidate combinations for diverse applications from transistors to macroscopic conducting wires.

Computational nanotechnology to benefit from expanded first-principles molecular dynamics

Posted by Jim Lewis on June 7th, 2015

A combination of techniques has made possible the expansion of problems that can be handled by first-principles molecular dynamics from a few hundred atoms to a very large system containing 32,768 atoms.

Conference video: Microscopic Reversibility: The Organizing Principle for Molecular Machines

Posted by Jim Lewis on May 13th, 2015

At the 2013 Conference Dean Astumian contrasted macroscopic machines at static equilibrium and molecular machines at dynamic equilibrium, and presented information ratchets and microscopic reversibility as the organizing principle of molecular machines.

Conference video: Multi-Million Atom Simulations for Single Atom Transistor Structures

Posted by Jim Lewis on May 12th, 2015

At the 2013 Conference Gerhard Klimeck presented the work of his computational nanotechnology network modeling nanoelectronic devices, using simulations of multi-million atom domains to understand the function of single atom devices embedded in larger nanostructures.

Nanothreads formed from smallest possible diamonds

Posted by Jim Lewis on May 2nd, 2015

A new form of carbon produced by very slowly releasing benzene compressed at 200,000 times atmospheric pressure may be the strongest material possible.

Foresight Institute Awards Feynman Prizes in Nanotechnology to Amanda S. Barnard, Joseph W. Lyding

Posted by Jim Lewis on April 23rd, 2015

The Theory Prize was given for research into diamond nanoparticles; the Experimental Prize was given for development of scanning tunneling microscope (STM) technology.