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Archive for the 'Computational nanotechnology' Category

Does quantum tunneling complicate theoretical studies of nanotechnology?

Posted by Jim Lewis on June 16th, 2011

Does the recent discovery that quantum tunneling controls a chemical reaction of a carbene complicate theoretical studies of nanotechnology, especially of diamond mechanosynthesis?

Theoretical work establishes structural stability of nanoscale diamond structures

Posted by Jim Lewis on June 10th, 2011

Computational studies show that small diamond structures of the type that might serve as nanoparts in diamondoid molecular machinery are structurally stable.

Computational circuit built from 74 small DNA molecules (with video)

Posted by Jim Lewis on June 9th, 2011

A biochemical circuit built from 74 small DNA molecules demonstrates an approach that may enable embedded control of molecular devices.

Statistical noise characterized in interactions of atoms with nanomachines

Posted by Jim Lewis on June 3rd, 2011

The interactions of xenon atoms with a nanoelectromechanical system have now been measured to characterize the statistical noise caused by atomic fluctuations.

Foresight@Google: Full Program of Speakers posted!

Posted by Christine Peterson on June 2nd, 2011

We are proud to announce our final conference program for Foresight@Google‘s 25th Anniversary Conference Celebration, held June 25-26 in Mountain View, CA.  For $50 off registration use code: NANODOT This weekend – full of plenary talks, panels, and breakout sessions – is a unique opportunity to be stimulated, enlightened and inspired by direct interaction with [...]

Computer simulation of evolution of primordial molecular machine

Posted by Jim Lewis on June 1st, 2011

A Monte-Carlo simulation shows that a simple self-replicating RNA-like molecule in a specific protective environment could evolve the ability to translate a genetic code to produce peptides.

TODAY is the last day for early rate on Foresight@Google

Posted by Christine Peterson on May 17th, 2011

Midnight tonight Pacific time is the deadline for the early registration rate on Foresight@Google, our 25th Anniversary Conference and Celebration. Check it out here: http://foresight.org/reunion Past participants have said: “This is mind candy for my soul. Having attended for two years now, this event stands alone in my mind as an opportunity to explore new horizons, [...]

New software aids design of 3-D DNA structures

Posted by Jim Lewis on May 12th, 2011

New software for scaffolded DNA origami makes it easier to predict what shape will result from a given DNA template.

Combined computational and experimental study illuminates motions of molecules across a surface

Posted by Jim Lewis on April 24th, 2011

Combined computational and experimental study shows molecules walking, hopping and flying across a surface; may lead to controlling molecular motion.

Will more efficient protein folding program advance nanotechnology?

Posted by Jim Lewis on March 29th, 2011

MIT scientists have devised much more efficient procedures for modeling protein folding in order to be able to model the folding of the flood of proteins sequences made available by modern genome sequencing methods.

Positional control of chemical reaction a step toward advanced nanotechnology

Posted by Jim Lewis on March 11th, 2011

A step toward advanced nanotechnology has been achieved by using attachment to a surface and confinement by surrounding molecules to make two molecules react to form a product that would not form if they were free to react in solution.

Work theoretically extracted from molecular motor

Posted by Jim Lewis on March 10th, 2011

Computational work links optically-induced molecular shape change to change in DNA structure to extract useful work.

Researchers Develop method to Distinguish Classical from Quantum Behavior in Electrons

Posted by Jim Lewis on December 23rd, 2010

Sometimes the behavior of electrons in nanostructures can be modelled using classical laws of motion, while at other times more computationally challenging quantum methods are necessary to obtain useful results. Christopher W. Ince of the Nanotechnology Research Foundation writes with news of a new method to distinguish classical from quantum behavior in electrons: Researchers from [...]

Feynman Prizes in Nanotechnology Awarded by Foresight Institute

Posted by Jim Lewis on December 20th, 2010

Palo Alto, CA – December 20, 2010 – The Foresight Institute, a nanotechnology education and public policy think tank based in Palo Alto, has announced the winners of the prestigious 2010 Foresight Institute Feynman Prizes in Nanotechnology. Established in 1993 in honor of Nobel Prize winner Richard Feynman, two $5,000 prizes are awarded in two [...]

Optimizing DNA strand lengths for assisted self-assembly

Posted by Jim Lewis on October 30th, 2010

Molecular dynamics calculations define optimum strand lengths for the assembly of DNA films as greater than 10 and less than 30 nucleotides.

Why terrorists are often engineers: implications for nanotechnology

Posted by Christine Peterson on September 16th, 2010

An IEEE Spectrum podcast asks the question, Why Are Terrorists Often Engineers? The blurb: With terrorism back in the news, so, too, is a curious footnote: Of the hundreds of individuals involved in political violence, nearly half of those with degrees have been engineers. This finding, first published in 2008, has been substantiated by two [...]

Check out the Allosphere at California NanoSystems Institute, UCSB

Posted by Christine Peterson on September 10th, 2010

We have reports from a couple of Foresight members who have toured the Allosphere, part of the California NanoSystems Institute at UC Santa Barbara, and it sounds truly impressive. From their website: The AlloSphere, a 30-foot diameter sphere built inside a 3-story near-to-anechoic (echo free) cube, allows for synthesis, manipulation, exploration and analysis of large-scale [...]

Nominations now open for 2010 Feynman Prize in Nanotechnology

Posted by Christine Peterson on July 7th, 2010

The nomination/submission process for the 2010 Foresight Institute Feynman Prizes in Nanotechnology is now open.  Two $5000 prizes are offered, one for theory and one for experimental achievement.  These prizes recognize progress toward the goal of atomic-level control in the construction of macroscale 3D objects: an ambitious goal but one toward which physicist Richard Feynman [...]

Modeling the recharging of used hydrogen abstraction tool

Posted by Christine Peterson on May 28th, 2010

Foresight Feynman Prize winner Robert Freitas brings to our attention the first published theoretical study of DMS (diamond mechanosynthesis) tool-workpiece operating envelopes and optimal tooltip trajectories for a complete positionally controlled reaction sequence, which he did with colleagues in Russia. He writes, “This paper represents the first extensive DMS tooltip trajectory analysis, examining a wide [...]

Keeping computers from ending science’s reproducibility

Posted by J. Storrs Hall on January 22nd, 2010

From Ars Technica: Nobel Intent, a thought-provoking article on what the prevalence of computational science portends for reproducibility in science: Victoria Stodden is currently at Yale Law School, and she gave a short talk at the recent Science Online meeting in which she discussed the legal aspects of ensuring that the code behind computational tools [...]