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Nanotechnology and the poor

The World Peace Herald and the Meridian Institute are discussing on the problem of whether nanotechnology will reach the poor.

Given years of history with open source software we already know how to solve this problem. This is pointed out by Bryan Bruns, a sociologist with the Foresight Institute, who promotes better policies on intellectual property, including full publication of publicly-funded research in ways that are accessible and affordable.

This feeds into a complex development problem. In an ideal world developments paid for by the public should be available to the public. At the same time business will be disinclined to push those developments to the marketing stage without some exclusive rights on the market. How does one resolve this problem?

One Response to “Nanotechnology and the poor”

  1. Anonymous Coward Says:

    Maybe not that complex of a problem

    "This feeds into a complex development problem. In an ideal world developments paid for by the public should be available to the public. At the same time business will be disinclined to push those developments to the marketing stage without some exclusive rights on the market. How does one resolve this problem?" If the cost of adopting a new innovation is low you don't have a problem. If the invention is very easy to duplicate once the first one is made, you don't have a problem. If adopting an expensive innovation clearly gives you a larger competitive advantage in the marketplace, you don't have a problem. I think that the only problem is when the innovation involves a significant expense and is perceived to provide a small, moderate or uncertain payback.

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