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Double blast of societal & ethical issues in nanotech

A massive amount of new writing on societal and ethical issues is available in a special double issue on nanotechnology jointly published by HYLE: International Journal for Philosophy of Chemistry and TECHNE: Journal of the Society for Philosophy and Technology, edited by Davis Baird & Joachim Schummer. Read more for the tables of contents and links. Includes everything from "Noumenal Technology: Reflections on the Incredible Tininess of Nano" to a very long discussion of the Drexler/Smalley debate. ["Noumenal"? Now we must study Kant to understand nanotech? Argh. --CP] Source: ICON list.

Special Double Issue on "Nanotech Challenges"
Jointly Published by
HYLE: International Journal for Philosophy of Chemistry http://www.hyle.org
and
TECHNE: Journal of the Society for Philosophy and Technology http://scholarlib.vt.edu/ejournals/SPT/

Edited by Davis Baird & Joachim Schummer

—————————————————
HYLE 11-1
Nanotech Challenges, Part 2
—————————————————
http://www.hyle.org/journal/issues/11-1/

Editorial (pp. 3-4)

Bruce V. Lewenstein (Cornell University, USA):
"What Counts as a 'Social and Ethical Issue' in Nanotechnology?" (pp.
5-18)

Christopher J. Preston (University of Montana, USA):
"The Promise and Threat of Nanotechnology: Can Environmental Ethics Guide US?" (pp. 19-44)

Louis Laurent & Jean-Claude Petit (Commissariat à l'Energie Atomique,
France):
"Nanosciences and its Convergence with other Technologies: New Golden Age or Apocalypse?" (pp. 45-76)

Gregor Schiemann (University of Wuppertal, Germany): "Nanotechnology and Nature: On Two Criteria for Understanding their Relationship" (pp. 77-96)

Joseph C. Pitt (Virginia Tech, USA):
Book Review: "Thing Knowledge: A Philosophy of Scientific Instruments" by Davis Baird, Berkeley 2004 (pp. 97-99)

—————————————————
TECHNE 8-3
Nanotech Challenges, Part 2
—————————————————
(coming soon)

Editorial

Alfred Nordmann (Technical University of Darmstadt, Germany): "Noumenal Technology: Reflections on the Incredible Tininess of Nano"

Arne Hessenbruch (Massachusetts Institute of Technology, USA): "Beyond Truth: Pleasure of Nanofutures"

Marc J. de Vries (Delft University of Technology, Netherlands): "Analyzing the Complexity of Nanotechnology"

Joseph C. Pitt (Virginia Tech, USA):
"'When is an Image Not an Image?"

—————————————————
HYLE 10-2
Nanotech Challenges, Part 1
—————————————————
http://www.hyle.org/journal/issues/10-2/

Editorial (pp. 63-64)

Bernadette Bensaude-Vincent (University of Paris X, France): "Two Cultures of Nanotechnology?" (pp. 65-82)

Otavio Bueno (University of South Carolina, USA):
"The Drexler-Smalley Debated on Nanotechnology: Incommensurability at Work?" (pp. 83-98)

Cyrus C.M. Mody (Chemical Heritage Foundation, USA):
"Small, but Determined: Technological Determinism in Nanoscience" (pp.
99-128)

Jose Lopez (University of Ottawa, Canada):
"Bridging the Gaps: Science Fiction in Nanotechnology" (pp. 129-152)

Martin Meyer & Osmo Kuusi (University of Sussex, UK; VATT Helsinki,
Finland):
"Nanotechnology: Generalizations in an Interdisciplinary Field of Science and Technology" (pp. 153-168)

Pierre Laszlo (University of Liège, Belgium):
Essay Review "Is There Life After Partington?" (pp. 169-178)

Book Reviews:
Shawn B. Allin (Spring Hill College): Joseph E. Earley (ed.): "Chemical
Explanation: Characteristics Development, Autonomy", New York, 2003 (pp.
179-181)

Vladimír Karpenko (University of Prague): William R. Newman & Lawrence M. Principe: "Alchemy Tried in the Fire: Starkey, Boyle, and the Fate of Helmontian Chymistry", Chicago, 2002 (pp. 181-184)

Call for Participants
Philip Ball: "The Molecular Sculpture Project" (pp. 185-188)

Bibliography
Joachim Schummer: "Studies on Nanoscience and Nanotechnology"

—————————————————
TECHNE 8-2
Nanotech Challenges, Part 1
—————————————————
http://scholar.lib.vt.edu/ejournals/SPT/v8n2/

Editorial

Alexei Grinbaum & Jean-Pierre Dupuy (Ecole Polytechnique, France): "Living with Uncertainty: Toward the Ongoing Normative Assessment of Nanotechnology"

Sven Ove Hansson (Royal Institute of Technology, Schweden): "Great Uncertainty about Small Things"

Jochen Hennig (Humboldt University Berlin, Germany):
"Changes in the Design of Scanning Tunneling Microscopic Images from 1980 to 1990"

Joachim Schummer (University of Darmstadt, Germany):
"'Societal and Ethical Implications of Nanotechnology': Meanings, Interest Groups, and Social Dynamics"

Christopher Toumey (University of South Carolina, USA): "Anticipating Public Reactions to Nanotechnology"

One Response to “Double blast of societal & ethical issues in nanotech”

  1. Chemisor Says:

    Noumenal

    > "Noumenal"? Now we must study Kant to understand nanotech? Argh. –CP

    "Noumenal" means "something understood without the use of the senses". Because nanobots don't currently exist, our understanding of them must necessarily be noumenal, based on mostly theoretical designs.

    "Noumenal" would also apply to things like nanotech brain mods uploading direct memory images. Sensory stacks in the cortex are sufficiently well-organized to permit this.

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