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New software aids design of 3-D DNA structures

Thursday, May 12th, 2011

New software for scaffolded DNA origami makes it easier to predict what shape will result from a given DNA template.

DNA nanotechnology builds 3D forms with complex curves (includes video)

Wednesday, April 20th, 2011

The capabilities of scaffolded DNA origami procedures have been expanded to construct arbitrary, two- and three-dimensional shapes.

One-molecule robot to be presented at January’s TEDxCaltech conference

Sunday, January 2nd, 2011

A one-molecule robot capable of following a trail of chemical breadcrumbs will be presented at TEDxCaltech-Feynman’s Vision: The Next 50 Years.

Making and opening a Mobius strip with DNA Kirigami

Tuesday, October 12th, 2010

Reconfiguring the topology of DNA nanostructures offers novel architectures for nanodevices.

DNA springs enable mechanical control of enzymatic reaction

Friday, October 8th, 2010

DNA springs mechanically control an enzymatic reactions by exerting force on specific parts of the enzyme molecule.

Self-assembly of carbon nanotubes into two-dimensional geometries using DNA origami templates

Tuesday, November 10th, 2009

Self-assembly of carbon nanotubes into two-dimensional geometries using DNA origami templates. Harnessing DNA origami to arrange CNTs.

Feynman’s Path to Nanotech (part 5)

Friday, July 10th, 2009

Is it Worth Starting Now? Surely, you will say, it would have been wonderful if back in 1959 people had taken Feynman seriously and really tried the Feynman path: we’d have the full-fledged paraphernalia of real, live molecular machinery now, with everything ranging from nanofactories to cell-repair machines. After all, it’s been 50 years. The [...]

Nano-boxes from DNA origami

Thursday, May 7th, 2009

Just a week ago I was at NIST to hear a talk by Paul Rothemund, winner of the 2006 Feynman Prize with Erik Winfree for the invention of DNA Origami. In just 3 years this has taken off in a big way. This story at Nanowerk News reports the latest: Danish researchers have made a [...]

Advancing nanotechnology by organizing functional components on addressable DNA scaffolds

Wednesday, April 29th, 2009

Two recent publications provide more evidence of the growing capability of DNA scaffolds to support complex and interactive functions.

DNA nanotechnology builds large structures from information-rich seeds

Monday, March 30th, 2009

DNA origami structures act as seeds to program the construction of structures up to 100 times larger.

Structural DNA nanotechnology arrays devices to capture molecular building blocks

Friday, February 20th, 2009

Two independently controlled nanomechanical devices can be positioned on a two-dimensional DNA grid so that they can cooperate to capture between them one of four DNA building blocks, determined by which of two possible states each device is set to.

Cut-and-paste single molecule nanotechnology using DNA

Friday, October 17th, 2008

A group of German scientists have developed a new slant on DNA nanotechnology by using atomic force microscopy to assemble a DNA scaffold on a surface to which molecular building blocks can then bind.

Do-it-yourself nanotechnology objects from DNA

Friday, April 4th, 2008

Snowbird, Utah is the place to be for nanotechnologists on April 22-25 for the 5th Annual Conference on Foundations of Nanoscience (FNANO08): Self-Assembled Architectures and Devices. Those of you who have attended Foresight research conferences will recognize a number of familiar names and lots of new ones. Mark Sims of Nanorex tells us that they [...]

Building chips with DNA nanotechnology

Tuesday, February 26th, 2008

Researchers at IBM are developing DNA nanotechnology to assemble nanoelectronic components into arrays in a bid to replace current lithographic methods of making computer chips.

DNA building blocks that change shape provide new tool for nanotechnology

Friday, February 8th, 2008

Tetrahedrons made from DNA that extend and shorten in response to added short strands of DNA may provide new nanotech methods of drug delivery, but may present even more exciting possibilities for atomically precise functional nanosystems.

Forbes’ 2006 Top 5 nanotechnology breakthroughs

Wednesday, December 27th, 2006

Forbes announces its top five nanotechnology breakthroughs for 2006, and we’re not surprised to see the winner of this year’s Foresight Institute Feynman Prize in Nanotechnology listed as #1: 1. DNA origami, at Caltech 2. Nanomagnets to clean up drinking water, at Rice 3. Arrays connect nanowire transistors with neurons, at Harvard 4. Single nanotube [...]

DNA origami from Caltech may be useful for nanoscale factory

Monday, March 20th, 2006

From Alan Boyle, science editor at MSNBC, news of DNA self-assembly work at the lab of Eric Winfree of Caltech: “A computer scientist has developed a method to weave stringy DNA molecules into nanometer-scale, two-dimensional patterns ranging from smiley faces to a map of the Americas. “Experts say the ‘DNA origami’ procedure laid out by [...]

Rigid addressable nanoscaffolds & single-stranded DNA origami

Wednesday, October 26th, 2005

Liveblogging the Foresight Conference: Apologies for not blogging yesterday’s afternoon session, including the “Controversies in Nanotechnology” talk (by me), the IP talk by Stanford prof Mark Lemley, the IP panel (I was moderating), and the Public Equity panel — featuring the colorful Michael Weiner of Biophan, who advised against taking investment funds from VCs. This [...]

More building blocks for DNA nanotechnology

Monday, March 1st, 2004

Scientists Brew Tree-Shaped DNA: "Researchers from Cornell University have synthesized a new type of DNA that can be used as a nanotechnology building block. … The Cornell researchers have found a way to make branched, or Y-shaped DNA, and have constructed dendrimer, or tree-shaped, DNA by connecting branched DNA." Alternate URL

DNA Origami: Clonable structures for nanotechnolog

Monday, February 16th, 2004

Roland Piquepaille writes "Scientists at The Scripps Research Institute (TSRI) have constructed a single strand of DNA that spontaneously folds into a highly rigid, nanoscale octahedron. These clonable structures represent a breakthrough because they can be manipulated with the standard tools of molecular biology and can easily be cloned, replicated, amplified, evolved, and adapted for various applications. This opens the way to future nanotools and to the minuscule computers of tomorrow, even if we are quite far from any real products. This overview contains more details. You'll also see a great picture of a clonable DNA octahedron, roughly the size of a small virus."